Background Missense mutations often impair protein folding and intracellular processing, which can be improved by small compounds with chaperone-like activity. However, little has been done in coagulopathies, where even modest increases of functional levels could have therapeutic implications. Objectives To rescue the expression of factor IX (FIX) variants affected by missense mutations associated with type I hemophilia B (HB) through chaperone-like compounds. Methods Expression studies of recombinant (r)FIX variants and evaluation of secreted levels (ELISA), intracellular trafficking (immunofluorescence) and activity (coagulant assays) before and after treatment of cells with chaperone-like compounds. Results As a model we chose the most frequent HB mutation (p.R294Q, ~100 patients), compared with other recurrent mutations associated with severe/moderate type I HB. Immunofluorescence studies revealed retention of rFIX variants in the endoplasmic reticulum and negligible localization in the Golgi, thus indicating impaired intracellular trafficking. Consistently, and in agreement with coagulation phenotypes in patients, all missense mutations resulted in impaired secretion (< 1% wild-type rFIX). Sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) quantitatively improved trafficking to the Golgi and dose dependently promoted secretion (from 0.3 ± 0.1% to 1.5 ± 0.3%) only of the rFIX-294Q variant. Noticeably, this variant displayed a specific coagulant activity that was higher (~2.0 fold) than that of wild-type rFIX in all treatment conditions. Importantly, coagulant activity was concurrently increased to levels (3.0 ± 0.9%) that, if achieved in patients, would ameliorate the bleeding phenotype. Conclusions Altogether, our data detail molecular mechanisms underlying type I HB and candidate NaPBA as affordable 'personalized' therapeutics for patients affected by the highly frequent p.R294Q mutation, and with reduced access to substitutive therapy.

The chaperone-like sodium phenylbutyrate improves factor IX intracellular trafficking and activity impaired by the frequent p.R294Q mutation

Pignani, S;Ferrarese, M;Lombardi, S;Balestra, D;Pinton, P;Bernardi, F;Pinotti, M;Branchini, A
2018

Abstract

Background Missense mutations often impair protein folding and intracellular processing, which can be improved by small compounds with chaperone-like activity. However, little has been done in coagulopathies, where even modest increases of functional levels could have therapeutic implications. Objectives To rescue the expression of factor IX (FIX) variants affected by missense mutations associated with type I hemophilia B (HB) through chaperone-like compounds. Methods Expression studies of recombinant (r)FIX variants and evaluation of secreted levels (ELISA), intracellular trafficking (immunofluorescence) and activity (coagulant assays) before and after treatment of cells with chaperone-like compounds. Results As a model we chose the most frequent HB mutation (p.R294Q, ~100 patients), compared with other recurrent mutations associated with severe/moderate type I HB. Immunofluorescence studies revealed retention of rFIX variants in the endoplasmic reticulum and negligible localization in the Golgi, thus indicating impaired intracellular trafficking. Consistently, and in agreement with coagulation phenotypes in patients, all missense mutations resulted in impaired secretion (< 1% wild-type rFIX). Sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) quantitatively improved trafficking to the Golgi and dose dependently promoted secretion (from 0.3 ± 0.1% to 1.5 ± 0.3%) only of the rFIX-294Q variant. Noticeably, this variant displayed a specific coagulant activity that was higher (~2.0 fold) than that of wild-type rFIX in all treatment conditions. Importantly, coagulant activity was concurrently increased to levels (3.0 ± 0.9%) that, if achieved in patients, would ameliorate the bleeding phenotype. Conclusions Altogether, our data detail molecular mechanisms underlying type I HB and candidate NaPBA as affordable 'personalized' therapeutics for patients affected by the highly frequent p.R294Q mutation, and with reduced access to substitutive therapy.
2018
Pignani, S; Todaro, A; Ferrarese, M; Marchi, S; Lombardi, S; Balestra, D; Pinton, P; Bernardi, F; Pinotti, M; Branchini, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2392429
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