Visceral-abdominal adiposity, a widely recognized cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor, is frequently associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia (1). The Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-mediated oxidative modification of LDL cholesterol is implicated in the etiopathogenesis of several forms of CVD. We evaluated the interrelationships among Body Fat Distribution assessed by Dual Energy X-Ray absorptiometry (DXA), oxidant (hydroperoxides) and antioxidant (total antioxidants, Uric Acid and Thiols) markers and lipidic profile (Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol, Tryglicerides): This cross-sectional study was based on a sample of 132 healthy women. We found significant correlations between abdominal fat and LDL cholesterol (r = 0.300, p<0.05), LDL/HDL ratio (r = 0.339, p<0.001), tryglicerides (r = 0.267, p<0.001) and HDL cholesterol (r = -0.199, p<0.05). Total and abdominal fat, were significantly correlated with total antioxidants (r = 0.257, p<0.01 and 0.259, p<0.01 respectively) due to the essential contribute of Uric Acid, the highest concentrated endogen antioxidants of human organism, which is mostly associated with fat stored in abdomen (r= 0.371, p<0.001). Hydroperoxides only showed a positive correlation with fat localized on legs (r = 0.226, p<0.01). All association persisted after adjusting for age values. Finally, no significant associations between any components of lipid profile and antioxidant and oxidant markers were discovered. Our results are consistent with a possible influence of body fat distribution on two well known CVD risk factors as dyslipidemia and Oxidative Stress. It is confirmed that the fat stored in abdomen is mostly linked to an enhanced LDL/HDL ratio. This relationship has been explained as one of the principal reason why abdominal-visceral fat is considered a key player in the development of type 2 diabetes and atherogenesis. Interestingly legs fat mass, widely considered much less harmful than abdominal, shows to be positively correlated with systemic Oxidative Stress. This last result may open new perspectives in the comprehension of mechanisms involved in the generation of ROS.

Body fat distribution may influence both lipidemic and oxidative profiles in women. Results of Cross-sectional study

CERVELLATI, Carlo;PASCALE, Giuliana;GUARIENTO, Angela;BONACCORSI, Gloria;BERGAMINI, Carlo;PANSINI, Francesco Saverio;
2008

Abstract

Visceral-abdominal adiposity, a widely recognized cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor, is frequently associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia (1). The Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-mediated oxidative modification of LDL cholesterol is implicated in the etiopathogenesis of several forms of CVD. We evaluated the interrelationships among Body Fat Distribution assessed by Dual Energy X-Ray absorptiometry (DXA), oxidant (hydroperoxides) and antioxidant (total antioxidants, Uric Acid and Thiols) markers and lipidic profile (Total, LDL and HDL cholesterol, Tryglicerides): This cross-sectional study was based on a sample of 132 healthy women. We found significant correlations between abdominal fat and LDL cholesterol (r = 0.300, p<0.05), LDL/HDL ratio (r = 0.339, p<0.001), tryglicerides (r = 0.267, p<0.001) and HDL cholesterol (r = -0.199, p<0.05). Total and abdominal fat, were significantly correlated with total antioxidants (r = 0.257, p<0.01 and 0.259, p<0.01 respectively) due to the essential contribute of Uric Acid, the highest concentrated endogen antioxidants of human organism, which is mostly associated with fat stored in abdomen (r= 0.371, p<0.001). Hydroperoxides only showed a positive correlation with fat localized on legs (r = 0.226, p<0.01). All association persisted after adjusting for age values. Finally, no significant associations between any components of lipid profile and antioxidant and oxidant markers were discovered. Our results are consistent with a possible influence of body fat distribution on two well known CVD risk factors as dyslipidemia and Oxidative Stress. It is confirmed that the fat stored in abdomen is mostly linked to an enhanced LDL/HDL ratio. This relationship has been explained as one of the principal reason why abdominal-visceral fat is considered a key player in the development of type 2 diabetes and atherogenesis. Interestingly legs fat mass, widely considered much less harmful than abdominal, shows to be positively correlated with systemic Oxidative Stress. This last result may open new perspectives in the comprehension of mechanisms involved in the generation of ROS.
body Fat distribution; Lipids
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/1377553
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact