A risk factors for the development of COPD is exposure to the smoke of biomass fuels used to heat and cook in poorly ventilated homes. We measured respiratory function in healthy dwellers of 2 villages in the Everest region of Nepal, where indoor pollution is rampant, due to the lack of chimney, but which are free of traffic or industrial pollution. Methods: 232 subjects (80F, 152M) performed spirometry (Spirojet, GMbH, Niederlauer, D). No F smoked. 19 M (12.5%) smoked <10 packs/year. Age years FEV1/VC % pred. FEV1 %pred FEF50 %pred F (80) 36 (15-87) 102.6 (79-139) 102.5 (51-133) 91.3 (25-173) M no smokers (133) 31 (14-75) 81.4 (52-104) 97.9 (58-144) 103.7 (25-178) M smokers (19) 27.5 (16-40) 102.3 (83-128) 100.7 (82-136) 111 (64-166) Results: 17F (21.2%) and 19M (12.5%, 1 smoker) had bronchial obstruction (FEV1/VC ≤88%): 15F and 11M mild obstruction; 1M moderate; 2F, 7M moderately severe. 11F (17.5%) and 13M (9.8%) without bronchial obstruction had the typical concave shape of a mild obstructive pattern with FEF50% ≤75%.This slowing in the terminal portion of the spirogram, even when the initial part is not affected is thought to be the earliest change associated with airflow obstruction in the peripheral airways (Pellegrino et al 2005). In total, 35% of F and 21% of M show evidence of either clear or early bronchial obstruction. Conclusion: in this mountain population, living in an area free of traffic or industrial pollution, the exposure to indoor pollution, but not the smoke habit, is the main risk factor for the development of COPD. This is true especially for women who spend much of their time near a fireplace.

Respiratory function in subjects living in mountain villages in Nepal exposed to indoor but not traffic or industrial pollution

POMIDORI, Luca;COGO, Annaluisa
2008

Abstract

A risk factors for the development of COPD is exposure to the smoke of biomass fuels used to heat and cook in poorly ventilated homes. We measured respiratory function in healthy dwellers of 2 villages in the Everest region of Nepal, where indoor pollution is rampant, due to the lack of chimney, but which are free of traffic or industrial pollution. Methods: 232 subjects (80F, 152M) performed spirometry (Spirojet, GMbH, Niederlauer, D). No F smoked. 19 M (12.5%) smoked <10 packs/year. Age years FEV1/VC % pred. FEV1 %pred FEF50 %pred F (80) 36 (15-87) 102.6 (79-139) 102.5 (51-133) 91.3 (25-173) M no smokers (133) 31 (14-75) 81.4 (52-104) 97.9 (58-144) 103.7 (25-178) M smokers (19) 27.5 (16-40) 102.3 (83-128) 100.7 (82-136) 111 (64-166) Results: 17F (21.2%) and 19M (12.5%, 1 smoker) had bronchial obstruction (FEV1/VC ≤88%): 15F and 11M mild obstruction; 1M moderate; 2F, 7M moderately severe. 11F (17.5%) and 13M (9.8%) without bronchial obstruction had the typical concave shape of a mild obstructive pattern with FEF50% ≤75%.This slowing in the terminal portion of the spirogram, even when the initial part is not affected is thought to be the earliest change associated with airflow obstruction in the peripheral airways (Pellegrino et al 2005). In total, 35% of F and 21% of M show evidence of either clear or early bronchial obstruction. Conclusion: in this mountain population, living in an area free of traffic or industrial pollution, the exposure to indoor pollution, but not the smoke habit, is the main risk factor for the development of COPD. This is true especially for women who spend much of their time near a fireplace.
respiratory function; mountain villages; indoor pollution.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/533884
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact