DNA-binding drugs have been reported to be able to interfere with the activity of transcription factors in a sequence-dependent manner, leading to alteration of transcription. This and similar effects could have important practical applications in the experimental therapy of many human pathologies, including neoplastic diseases and viral infections. The analysis of the biological activity of DNA-binding drugs by footprinting, gel retardation, polymerase chain reaction, and in vitro transcription studies does not allow a real time study of binding to DNA and dissociation of the generated drugs/DNA complexes. The recent development of biosensor technologies for biospecific interaction analysis (BIA) enables monitoring of a variety of molecular reactions in real-time by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In this study, we demonstrate that molecular interactions between DNA-binding drugs (chromomycin, mithramycin, distamycin, and MEN 10567) and biotinylated target DNA probes immobilized on sensor chips is detectable by SPR technology using a commercially available biosensor. The target DNA sequences were synthetic oligonucleotides mimicking the Sp1, NF-kB, and TFIID binding sites of the long terminal repeat of the human immunodeficiency type 1 virus. The results obtained demonstrate that mithramycin/DNA complexes are less stable than chromomycin/DNA complexes; distamycin binds to both NF-kB and TATA box oligonucleotides, but distamycin/(NF-kB)DNA complexes are not stable; the distamycin analog MEN 10567 binds to the NF-kB mer and the generated drug/DNA complexes are stable. The experimental approach described in this study allows fast analysis of molecular interactions between DNA-binding drugs and selected target DNA sequences. Therefore, this method could be used to identify new drugs exhibiting differential binding activities to selected regions of viral and eukaryotic gene promoters.

Biospecific interaction analysis (BIA) of low-molecular weight DNA-binding drugs.

GAMBARI, Roberto;FERIOTTO, Giordana;BIANCHI, Nicoletta;MISCHIATI, Carlo
2000

Abstract

DNA-binding drugs have been reported to be able to interfere with the activity of transcription factors in a sequence-dependent manner, leading to alteration of transcription. This and similar effects could have important practical applications in the experimental therapy of many human pathologies, including neoplastic diseases and viral infections. The analysis of the biological activity of DNA-binding drugs by footprinting, gel retardation, polymerase chain reaction, and in vitro transcription studies does not allow a real time study of binding to DNA and dissociation of the generated drugs/DNA complexes. The recent development of biosensor technologies for biospecific interaction analysis (BIA) enables monitoring of a variety of molecular reactions in real-time by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In this study, we demonstrate that molecular interactions between DNA-binding drugs (chromomycin, mithramycin, distamycin, and MEN 10567) and biotinylated target DNA probes immobilized on sensor chips is detectable by SPR technology using a commercially available biosensor. The target DNA sequences were synthetic oligonucleotides mimicking the Sp1, NF-kB, and TFIID binding sites of the long terminal repeat of the human immunodeficiency type 1 virus. The results obtained demonstrate that mithramycin/DNA complexes are less stable than chromomycin/DNA complexes; distamycin binds to both NF-kB and TATA box oligonucleotides, but distamycin/(NF-kB)DNA complexes are not stable; the distamycin analog MEN 10567 binds to the NF-kB mer and the generated drug/DNA complexes are stable. The experimental approach described in this study allows fast analysis of molecular interactions between DNA-binding drugs and selected target DNA sequences. Therefore, this method could be used to identify new drugs exhibiting differential binding activities to selected regions of viral and eukaryotic gene promoters.
2000
Gambari, Roberto; Feriotto, Giordana; C., Rutigliano; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Mischiati, Carlo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/518689
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