This paper attempts to review the most interesting findings in the use of the theory of critical distances (TCD) to predict fatigue strength of notched mechanical components. Initially, the most modern formalisations of the TCD are considered, showing their peculiarities and differences. An ad-hoc section is then focused on the multiaxial high-cycle fatigue problem, considering all the open questions arising in the presence of complex stress fields damaging the fatigue process zone in the vicinity of the stress concentrator apex. Subsequently, the physical idea on the structural volume concept is briefly investigated showing some peculiar results generated in the high-cycle fatigue regime under both uniaxial and biaxial fatigue loading. Finally, our idea to extend the use of the TCD down to the low-medium cycle fatigue regime is briefly explained. Working in collaboration with Prof. David Taylor, we have spent the last five years investigating this theory both to better understand its physical meaning and to systematically check its accuracy in predicting notch fatigue strength under different loading conditions. After so much work done in this area we feel so confident to proudly and loudly say that the TCD is a powerful engineering tool suitable for assessing real mechanical components in situations of practical interest. Finally, it can be highlighted also that the best TCD formalisations were seen to be those based on the use of linear-elastic stresses. This suggests that such a theory can successfully be used to post-process simple linear-elastic finite element (FE) models reducing time and costs of the design process.

The Theory of Critical Distances: a review of its applications in fatigue

SUSMEL, Luca
2008

Abstract

This paper attempts to review the most interesting findings in the use of the theory of critical distances (TCD) to predict fatigue strength of notched mechanical components. Initially, the most modern formalisations of the TCD are considered, showing their peculiarities and differences. An ad-hoc section is then focused on the multiaxial high-cycle fatigue problem, considering all the open questions arising in the presence of complex stress fields damaging the fatigue process zone in the vicinity of the stress concentrator apex. Subsequently, the physical idea on the structural volume concept is briefly investigated showing some peculiar results generated in the high-cycle fatigue regime under both uniaxial and biaxial fatigue loading. Finally, our idea to extend the use of the TCD down to the low-medium cycle fatigue regime is briefly explained. Working in collaboration with Prof. David Taylor, we have spent the last five years investigating this theory both to better understand its physical meaning and to systematically check its accuracy in predicting notch fatigue strength under different loading conditions. After so much work done in this area we feel so confident to proudly and loudly say that the TCD is a powerful engineering tool suitable for assessing real mechanical components in situations of practical interest. Finally, it can be highlighted also that the best TCD formalisations were seen to be those based on the use of linear-elastic stresses. This suggests that such a theory can successfully be used to post-process simple linear-elastic finite element (FE) models reducing time and costs of the design process.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/495652
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