The relation between the gut microbiota and human health is increasingly recognized. Recently, some evidence suggested that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota may be involved in the development of digestive cancers. A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines to investigate the association between the oral microbiota and digestive cancers. Several databases including Medline, Scopus, and Embase were searched by three independent reviewers, without date restriction. Over a total of 1654 records initially identified, 28 studies (2 prospective cohort studies and 26 case-controls) were selected. They investigated oral microbiota composition in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (n = 5), gastric cancer (n = 5), colorectal cancer (n = 9), liver carcinoma (n = 2), and pancreatic cancer (n = 7). In most of the studies, oral microbiota composition was found to be different between digestive cancer patients and controls. Particularly, oral microbiota dysbiosis and specific bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, appeared to be associated with colorectal cancers. Current evidence suggests that differences exist in oral microbiota composition between patients with and without digestive cancers. Further studies are required to investigate and validate oral–gut microbial transmission patterns and their role in digestive cancer carcinogenesis.

Oral Bacterial Microbiota in Digestive Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

de’Angelis, Nicola
;
Carra, Maria Clotilde
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

The relation between the gut microbiota and human health is increasingly recognized. Recently, some evidence suggested that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota may be involved in the development of digestive cancers. A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines to investigate the association between the oral microbiota and digestive cancers. Several databases including Medline, Scopus, and Embase were searched by three independent reviewers, without date restriction. Over a total of 1654 records initially identified, 28 studies (2 prospective cohort studies and 26 case-controls) were selected. They investigated oral microbiota composition in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (n = 5), gastric cancer (n = 5), colorectal cancer (n = 9), liver carcinoma (n = 2), and pancreatic cancer (n = 7). In most of the studies, oral microbiota composition was found to be different between digestive cancer patients and controls. Particularly, oral microbiota dysbiosis and specific bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, appeared to be associated with colorectal cancers. Current evidence suggests that differences exist in oral microbiota composition between patients with and without digestive cancers. Further studies are required to investigate and validate oral–gut microbial transmission patterns and their role in digestive cancer carcinogenesis.
2021
Reitano, Elisa; De’Angelis, Nicola; Gavriilidis, Paschalis; Gaiani, Federica; Memeo, Riccardo; Inchingolo, Riccardo; Bianchi, Giorgio; De’Angelis, Gian Luigi; Carra, Maria Clotilde
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2533874
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