Background and objective: Polypharmacy is common in older adults, particularly among those living in long-term care facilities. This condition represents a marker of clinical complexity and might directly affect the immunological response. However, there are limited data on the association of polypharmacy with vaccine immunogenicity. This study evaluated the immune response to anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in older residents of long-term care facilities as a function of the number of medications used. Methods: In 478 long-term care facility residents participating in the GeroCovid Vax study, we assessed SARS-CoV-2 trimeric S IgG levels through chemiluminescent assays before the vaccination and after 2, 6, and 12 months. A booster dose was administered between 6- and 12-month assessments. Sociodemographic information and data on chronic diseases and medications were derived from medical records. Based on the number of daily medications, residents were classified into the no polypharmacy (zero to four medications), polypharmacy (five to nine medications), and hyperpolypharmacy (ten or more medications) groups. Results: In the sample (mean age 82.1 years, 69.2% female), 200 (41.8%) residents were taking five or fewer medications/day (no polypharmacy), 229 (47.9%) had polypharmacy, and 49 (10.3%) had hyperpolypharmacy. Using linear mixed models adjusted for potential confounders, we found that hyperpolypharmacy was associated with a steeper antibody decline after 6 months from the first vaccine dose administration (β = - 0.29, 95% confidence interval - 0.54, - 0.03, p = 0.03) than no polypharmacy, while no significant differences were observed at 12 months. Conclusions: The humoral immune response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination of older residents showed only slight changes as a function of the number of medications taken. Although it seemed less durable among older residents with hyperpolypharmacy, the booster dose administration equalized such a difference.

Polypharmacy and Antibody Response to SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities: The GeroCovid Vax Study

Trevisan, Caterina
Co-primo
;
Volpato, Stefano;
2023

Abstract

Background and objective: Polypharmacy is common in older adults, particularly among those living in long-term care facilities. This condition represents a marker of clinical complexity and might directly affect the immunological response. However, there are limited data on the association of polypharmacy with vaccine immunogenicity. This study evaluated the immune response to anti-SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in older residents of long-term care facilities as a function of the number of medications used. Methods: In 478 long-term care facility residents participating in the GeroCovid Vax study, we assessed SARS-CoV-2 trimeric S IgG levels through chemiluminescent assays before the vaccination and after 2, 6, and 12 months. A booster dose was administered between 6- and 12-month assessments. Sociodemographic information and data on chronic diseases and medications were derived from medical records. Based on the number of daily medications, residents were classified into the no polypharmacy (zero to four medications), polypharmacy (five to nine medications), and hyperpolypharmacy (ten or more medications) groups. Results: In the sample (mean age 82.1 years, 69.2% female), 200 (41.8%) residents were taking five or fewer medications/day (no polypharmacy), 229 (47.9%) had polypharmacy, and 49 (10.3%) had hyperpolypharmacy. Using linear mixed models adjusted for potential confounders, we found that hyperpolypharmacy was associated with a steeper antibody decline after 6 months from the first vaccine dose administration (β = - 0.29, 95% confidence interval - 0.54, - 0.03, p = 0.03) than no polypharmacy, while no significant differences were observed at 12 months. Conclusions: The humoral immune response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination of older residents showed only slight changes as a function of the number of medications taken. Although it seemed less durable among older residents with hyperpolypharmacy, the booster dose administration equalized such a difference.
2023
Trevisan, Caterina; Haxhiaj, Labjona; Malara, Alba; Abbatecola, Angela; Fedele, Giorgio; Palmieri, Annapina; Leone, Pasqualina; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Stefanelli, Paola; Maggi, Stefania; Sergi, Giuseppe; Volpato, Stefano; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Onder, Graziano
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2530075
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