Psoriasis has emerged as a systemic disease characterized by skin and joint manifestations as well as systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities. Many progresses have been made in the comprehension of the immunological mechanisms involved in the exacerbation of psoriatic plaques, and initial studies have investigated the mechanisms that lead to extracutaneous disease manifestations, including endothelial disfunction and cardiovascular disease. In the past decade, the involvement of gut dysbiosis in the development of pathologies with inflammatory and autoimmune basis has clearly emerged. More recently, a major role for the skin microbiota in establishing the immunological tolerance in early life and as a source of antigens leading to cross-reactive responses towards self-antigens in adult life has also been evidenced. Gut microbiota can indeed be involved in shaping the immune and inflammatory response at systemic level and in fueling inflammation in the cutaneous and vascular compartments. Here, we summarized the microbiota-mediated mechanisms that, in the skin and gut, may promote and modulate local or systemic inflammation involved in psoriatic disease and endothelial dysfunction. We also analyze the emerging strategies for correcting dysbiosis or modulating skin and gut microbiota composition to integrate systemically existing pharmacological therapies for psoriatic disease. The possibility of merging systemic treatment and tailored microbial modifying therapies could increase the efficacy of the current treatments and potentially lower the effect on patient’s life quality.

The Use of Microbial Modifying Therapies to Prevent Psoriasis Exacerbation and Associated Cardiovascular Comorbidity

Eva Reali
Primo
;
Cristiana Caliceti;Paola Rizzo
Ultimo
2023

Abstract

Psoriasis has emerged as a systemic disease characterized by skin and joint manifestations as well as systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities. Many progresses have been made in the comprehension of the immunological mechanisms involved in the exacerbation of psoriatic plaques, and initial studies have investigated the mechanisms that lead to extracutaneous disease manifestations, including endothelial disfunction and cardiovascular disease. In the past decade, the involvement of gut dysbiosis in the development of pathologies with inflammatory and autoimmune basis has clearly emerged. More recently, a major role for the skin microbiota in establishing the immunological tolerance in early life and as a source of antigens leading to cross-reactive responses towards self-antigens in adult life has also been evidenced. Gut microbiota can indeed be involved in shaping the immune and inflammatory response at systemic level and in fueling inflammation in the cutaneous and vascular compartments. Here, we summarized the microbiota-mediated mechanisms that, in the skin and gut, may promote and modulate local or systemic inflammation involved in psoriatic disease and endothelial dysfunction. We also analyze the emerging strategies for correcting dysbiosis or modulating skin and gut microbiota composition to integrate systemically existing pharmacological therapies for psoriatic disease. The possibility of merging systemic treatment and tailored microbial modifying therapies could increase the efficacy of the current treatments and potentially lower the effect on patient’s life quality.
2023
Reali, Eva; Caliceti, Cristiana; Lorenzini, Antonello; Rizzo, Paola
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2529891
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