Objectives: To explore the risk of being prescribed/dispensed medications for respiratory symptoms and breathing difficulties in children with and without congenital anomalies. Design: A EUROlinkCAT population-based data linkage cohort study. Data on children with and without congenital anomalies were linked to prescription databases to identify children who did/did not receive antiasthmatic prescriptions. Data were analysed by age, European region, class of antiasthmatic, anomaly, sex, gestational age and birth cohort. Setting: Children born 2000-2014 in six regions within five European countries. Participants: 60 662 children with congenital anomalies and 1 722 912 reference children up to age 10 years. Primary outcome measure: Relative risks (RR) of >1 antiasthmatic prescription in a year, identified using Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification codes beginning with R03. Results: There were significant differences in the prescribing of antiasthmatics in the six regions. Children with congenital anomalies had a significantly higher risk of being prescribed antiasthmatics (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.48) compared with reference children. The increased risk was consistent across all regions and all age groups. Children with congenital anomalies were more likely to be prescribed beta-2 agonists (RR 1.71, 95% CI 1.60 to 1.83) and inhaled corticosteroids (RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.61 to 1.87). Children with oesophageal atresia, genetic syndromes and chromosomal anomalies had over twice the risk of being prescribed antiasthmatics compared with reference children. Children with congenital anomalies born <32 weeks gestational age were over twice as likely to be prescribed antiasthmatics than those born at term (RR 2.20, 95% CI 2.10 to 2.30). Conclusion: This study documents the additional burden of respiratory symptoms and breathing difficulties for children with congenital anomalies, particularly those born preterm, compared with children without congenital anomalies in the first 10 years of life. These findings are beneficial to clinicians and healthcare providers as they identify children with greater morbidity associated with respiratory symptoms, as indicated by antiasthmatic prescriptions.

Antiasthmatic prescriptions in children with and without congenital anomalies: a population-based study

Astolfi, Gianni;Ballardini, Elisa;
2023

Abstract

Objectives: To explore the risk of being prescribed/dispensed medications for respiratory symptoms and breathing difficulties in children with and without congenital anomalies. Design: A EUROlinkCAT population-based data linkage cohort study. Data on children with and without congenital anomalies were linked to prescription databases to identify children who did/did not receive antiasthmatic prescriptions. Data were analysed by age, European region, class of antiasthmatic, anomaly, sex, gestational age and birth cohort. Setting: Children born 2000-2014 in six regions within five European countries. Participants: 60 662 children with congenital anomalies and 1 722 912 reference children up to age 10 years. Primary outcome measure: Relative risks (RR) of >1 antiasthmatic prescription in a year, identified using Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification codes beginning with R03. Results: There were significant differences in the prescribing of antiasthmatics in the six regions. Children with congenital anomalies had a significantly higher risk of being prescribed antiasthmatics (RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.48) compared with reference children. The increased risk was consistent across all regions and all age groups. Children with congenital anomalies were more likely to be prescribed beta-2 agonists (RR 1.71, 95% CI 1.60 to 1.83) and inhaled corticosteroids (RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.61 to 1.87). Children with oesophageal atresia, genetic syndromes and chromosomal anomalies had over twice the risk of being prescribed antiasthmatics compared with reference children. Children with congenital anomalies born <32 weeks gestational age were over twice as likely to be prescribed antiasthmatics than those born at term (RR 2.20, 95% CI 2.10 to 2.30). Conclusion: This study documents the additional burden of respiratory symptoms and breathing difficulties for children with congenital anomalies, particularly those born preterm, compared with children without congenital anomalies in the first 10 years of life. These findings are beneficial to clinicians and healthcare providers as they identify children with greater morbidity associated with respiratory symptoms, as indicated by antiasthmatic prescriptions.
2023
Divin, Natalie; Given, Joanne Emma; Tan, Joachim; Astolfi, Gianni; Ballardini, Elisa; Barrachina-Bonet, Laia; Cavero-Carbonell, Clara; Coi, Alessio; Garne, Ester; Gissler, Mika; Heino, Anna; Jordan, Susan; Pierini, Anna; Scanlon, Ieuan; Urhøj, Stine Kjær; Morris, Joan K; Loane, Maria
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2525890
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact