Simple Summary To examine the role of [18F]FDG PET/CT for assessing response to immunotherapy in patients with some solid tumors. Seventeen Italian centers analyzed the role of serial [18F]FDG PET/CT scans in patients candidates and, later undergoing immunotherapy for some solid cancers. Serial [18F]FDG PET/CT can be useful in evaluating the response to therapy, soon after 3 and 6-months from the start of immunotherapy. The evidences were foud both in patients affected by lung cancer and malignant melanoma, although large prospective trials are needed for definitively confirmed these findings. AIM: To examine the role of [18F]FDG PET/CT for assessing response to immunotherapy in patients with some solid tumors. METHODS: Data recorded in a multicenter (n = 17), retrospective database between March and November 2021 were analyzed. The sample included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a solid tumor who underwent serial [18F]FDG PET/CT (before and after one or more cycles of immunotherapy), who were >18 years of age, and had a follow-up of at least 12 months after their first PET/CT scan. Patients enrolled in clinical trials or without a confirmed diagnosis of cancer were excluded. The authors classified cases as having a complete or partial metabolic response to immunotherapy, or stable or progressive metabolic disease, based on a visual and semiquantitative analysis according to the EORTC criteria. Clinical response to immunotherapy was assessed at much the same time points as the serial PET scans, and both the obtained responses were compared. RESULTS: The study concerned 311 patients (median age: 67; range: 31-89 years) in all. The most common neoplasm was lung cancer (56.9%), followed by malignant melanoma (32.5%). Nivolumab was administered in 46.3%, and pembrolizumab in 40.5% of patients. Baseline PET and a first PET scan performed at a median 3 months after starting immunotherapy were available for all 311 patients, while subsequent PET scans were obtained after a median 6, 12, 16, and 21 months for 199 (64%), 102 (33%), 46 (15%), and 23 (7%) patients, respectively. Clinical response to therapy was recorded at around the same time points after starting immunotherapy for 252 (81%), 173 (56%), 85 (27%), 40 (13%), and 22 (7%) patients, respectively. After a median 18 (1-137) months, 113 (36.3%) patients had died. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, metabolic responders on the first two serial PET scans showed a better prognosis than non-responders, while clinical response became prognostically informative from the second assessment after starting immunotherapy onwards. CONCLUSIONS: [18F]FDG PET/CT could have a role in the assessment of response to immunotherapy in patients with some solid tumors. It can provide prognostic information and thus contribute to a patient's appropriate treatment. Prospective randomized controlled trials are mandatory.

ITA-IMMUNO-PET: The Role of [18F]FDG PET/CT for Assessing Response to Immunotherapy in Patients with Some Solid Tumors

Urso L.;Bartolomei M.;
2023

Abstract

Simple Summary To examine the role of [18F]FDG PET/CT for assessing response to immunotherapy in patients with some solid tumors. Seventeen Italian centers analyzed the role of serial [18F]FDG PET/CT scans in patients candidates and, later undergoing immunotherapy for some solid cancers. Serial [18F]FDG PET/CT can be useful in evaluating the response to therapy, soon after 3 and 6-months from the start of immunotherapy. The evidences were foud both in patients affected by lung cancer and malignant melanoma, although large prospective trials are needed for definitively confirmed these findings. AIM: To examine the role of [18F]FDG PET/CT for assessing response to immunotherapy in patients with some solid tumors. METHODS: Data recorded in a multicenter (n = 17), retrospective database between March and November 2021 were analyzed. The sample included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a solid tumor who underwent serial [18F]FDG PET/CT (before and after one or more cycles of immunotherapy), who were >18 years of age, and had a follow-up of at least 12 months after their first PET/CT scan. Patients enrolled in clinical trials or without a confirmed diagnosis of cancer were excluded. The authors classified cases as having a complete or partial metabolic response to immunotherapy, or stable or progressive metabolic disease, based on a visual and semiquantitative analysis according to the EORTC criteria. Clinical response to immunotherapy was assessed at much the same time points as the serial PET scans, and both the obtained responses were compared. RESULTS: The study concerned 311 patients (median age: 67; range: 31-89 years) in all. The most common neoplasm was lung cancer (56.9%), followed by malignant melanoma (32.5%). Nivolumab was administered in 46.3%, and pembrolizumab in 40.5% of patients. Baseline PET and a first PET scan performed at a median 3 months after starting immunotherapy were available for all 311 patients, while subsequent PET scans were obtained after a median 6, 12, 16, and 21 months for 199 (64%), 102 (33%), 46 (15%), and 23 (7%) patients, respectively. Clinical response to therapy was recorded at around the same time points after starting immunotherapy for 252 (81%), 173 (56%), 85 (27%), 40 (13%), and 22 (7%) patients, respectively. After a median 18 (1-137) months, 113 (36.3%) patients had died. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, metabolic responders on the first two serial PET scans showed a better prognosis than non-responders, while clinical response became prognostically informative from the second assessment after starting immunotherapy onwards. CONCLUSIONS: [18F]FDG PET/CT could have a role in the assessment of response to immunotherapy in patients with some solid tumors. It can provide prognostic information and thus contribute to a patient's appropriate treatment. Prospective randomized controlled trials are mandatory.
2023
Evangelista, L.; Bianchi, A.; Annovazzi, A.; Sciuto, R.; Di Traglia, S.; Bauckneht, M.; Lanfranchi, F.; Morbelli, S.; Nappi, A. G.; Ferrari, C.; Rubini, G.; Panareo, S.; Urso, L.; Bartolomei, M.; D'Arienzo, D.; Valente, T.; Rossetti, V.; Caroli, P.; Matteucci, F.; Arico, D.; Bombaci, M.; Caponnetto, D.; Bertagna, F.; Albano, D.; Dondi, F.; Gusella, S.; Spimpolo, A.; Carriere, C.; Balma, M.; Buschiazzo, A.; Gallicchio, R.; Storto, G.; Ruffini, L.; Cervati, V.; Ledda, R. E.; Cervino, A. R.; Cuppari, L.; Burei, M.; Trifiro, G.; Brugola, E.; Zanini, C. A.; Alessi, A.; Fuoco, V.; Seregni, E.; Deandreis, D.; Liberini, V.; Moreci, A. M.; Ialuna, S.; Pulizzi, S.; De Rimini, M. L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2509473
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