Objective: This study aimed to investigate the potential role of aspirin in reducing the risk of preeclampsia and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies. Data sources: Medline, Embase, Google Scholar, Cochrane, and ClinicalTrial.gov databases were searched. Study eligibility criteria: The search and selection criteria were restricted to the English language. Methods: The primary outcome was the incidence of preeclampsia. The secondary outcomes included gestational hypertension; fetal growth restriction; preterm birth, either spontaneous or iatrogenic, before 34 weeks of gestation; gestational age at birth; neonatal birthweight; and adverse events secondary to the administration of aspirin, including antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage. In addition, subgroup analyses according to chorionicity (dichorionic vs monochorionic), aspirin dose, and gestational age at administration of aspirin (<16 vs ≥16 weeks of gestation) and considering only studies with a daily aspirin dose of ≥100 mg/d were performed. Head-to-head meta-analyses reporting results as summary odds ratios and mean differences were used to analyze categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Quality assessment for randomized controlled trials was independently performed by 2 researchers based on the risk of bias that was assessed using the revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials. The conclusion of the meta-analysis on the primary outcome was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Results: Overall, 9 studies (2273 twin pregnancies) were included. When considering all studies, the risk of preeclampsia was lower in twin pregnancies treated with aspirin than in those not treated with aspirin (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.85; P=.003), although there was no significant difference in the risk of gestational hypertension (P=.987), fetal growth restriction (P=.9), or adverse maternal and perinatal events (P=.9) in twin pregnancies treated with aspirin compared with those not treated with aspirin. There was no significant difference in the gestational age at birth (P=.2) and neonatal birthweight (P=.06) between women receiving aspirin and those not receiving aspirin. When considering only studies with an aspirin dose of >100 mg/d, the risk of preeclampsia (odds ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.86; P=.02) was significantly lower in pregnancies receiving aspirin than in those not receiving aspirin, Conversely, there was no significant difference in the risk of gestational hypertension (P=.20), fetal growth restriction (P=.1), gestational age at birth (P=.06), and neonatal weight (P=.05) between the 2 groups. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the risk of preeclampsia when considering only studies with an aspirin dose of >80 mg/d (P=.611). The association between the administration of aspirin and preeclampsia persisted when considering an aspirin dose of >100 mg/day or when the medication was started before 16 weeks of gestation. The overall quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation assessment was low. Conclusion: The administration of aspirin in women with twin pregnancies reduced the risk of preeclampsia. The findings from this study highlighted the need for randomized controlled trials elucidating the actual role of aspirin in affecting maternal and perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies.

Aspirin for prevention of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal outcome in twin pregnancies: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Acuti Martellucci, Cecilia;Flacco, Maria Elena
Penultimo
;
2023

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the potential role of aspirin in reducing the risk of preeclampsia and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies. Data sources: Medline, Embase, Google Scholar, Cochrane, and ClinicalTrial.gov databases were searched. Study eligibility criteria: The search and selection criteria were restricted to the English language. Methods: The primary outcome was the incidence of preeclampsia. The secondary outcomes included gestational hypertension; fetal growth restriction; preterm birth, either spontaneous or iatrogenic, before 34 weeks of gestation; gestational age at birth; neonatal birthweight; and adverse events secondary to the administration of aspirin, including antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage. In addition, subgroup analyses according to chorionicity (dichorionic vs monochorionic), aspirin dose, and gestational age at administration of aspirin (<16 vs ≥16 weeks of gestation) and considering only studies with a daily aspirin dose of ≥100 mg/d were performed. Head-to-head meta-analyses reporting results as summary odds ratios and mean differences were used to analyze categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Quality assessment for randomized controlled trials was independently performed by 2 researchers based on the risk of bias that was assessed using the revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials. The conclusion of the meta-analysis on the primary outcome was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Results: Overall, 9 studies (2273 twin pregnancies) were included. When considering all studies, the risk of preeclampsia was lower in twin pregnancies treated with aspirin than in those not treated with aspirin (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.85; P=.003), although there was no significant difference in the risk of gestational hypertension (P=.987), fetal growth restriction (P=.9), or adverse maternal and perinatal events (P=.9) in twin pregnancies treated with aspirin compared with those not treated with aspirin. There was no significant difference in the gestational age at birth (P=.2) and neonatal birthweight (P=.06) between women receiving aspirin and those not receiving aspirin. When considering only studies with an aspirin dose of >100 mg/d, the risk of preeclampsia (odds ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.86; P=.02) was significantly lower in pregnancies receiving aspirin than in those not receiving aspirin, Conversely, there was no significant difference in the risk of gestational hypertension (P=.20), fetal growth restriction (P=.1), gestational age at birth (P=.06), and neonatal weight (P=.05) between the 2 groups. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the risk of preeclampsia when considering only studies with an aspirin dose of >80 mg/d (P=.611). The association between the administration of aspirin and preeclampsia persisted when considering an aspirin dose of >100 mg/day or when the medication was started before 16 weeks of gestation. The overall quality of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation assessment was low. Conclusion: The administration of aspirin in women with twin pregnancies reduced the risk of preeclampsia. The findings from this study highlighted the need for randomized controlled trials elucidating the actual role of aspirin in affecting maternal and perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies.
2023
D'Antonio, Francesco; Khalil, Asma; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Fichera, Anna; Herrera, Mauricio; Buca, Danilo; Morelli, Roberta; Cerra, Chiara; Orabona, Rossana; Acuti Martellucci, Cecilia; Flacco, Maria Elena; Prefumo, Federico
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2502940
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