High-chromium cast irons are frequently used in high-demanding applications, where low production costs and wear performance are key factors. The excellent abrasive resistance of these alloys results from the overall microstructural features, i.e., type, morphology, and distribution of hard primary and secondary carbides, along with the matrix constituents. Such a microstructure is the result of the chemical composition and solidification process, even though it could be further tuned by heat treatments. These latter are usually performed to destabilize the austenite and to induce the precipitation of secondary carbides. The present study investigates the combined effect of destabilization heat treatment route and erodent powder type on the erosive wear behavior of two commercial hypereutectic white cast irons. The as-received and the heat-treated materials were analyzed through optical and scanning electron microscopy, hardness tests, and X-ray diffraction to determine the relationship between microstructural variations and applied heat treatment. The erosive resistance was evaluated per the ASTM G76 standard in a purpose-built air blast test rig. Experiments were performed considering a raw meal powder, commonly used in cement factories, and Al2O3 as erodent powders. The adopted heat treatments were effective in increasing the overall hardness of the material, but this was not directly related to the erosion resistance. By contrast, the relative hardness ratio, i.e., erodent/target hardness, affects the erosion rate and different behaviors in relation to the softer/harder erodent particles were found.

Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Chromium Cast Iron: Combined Effect of Erodent Powders and Destabilization Heat Treatments

Fortini, A
Primo
;
Suman, A
Secondo
;
Zanini, N
Penultimo
;
Cruciani, G
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

High-chromium cast irons are frequently used in high-demanding applications, where low production costs and wear performance are key factors. The excellent abrasive resistance of these alloys results from the overall microstructural features, i.e., type, morphology, and distribution of hard primary and secondary carbides, along with the matrix constituents. Such a microstructure is the result of the chemical composition and solidification process, even though it could be further tuned by heat treatments. These latter are usually performed to destabilize the austenite and to induce the precipitation of secondary carbides. The present study investigates the combined effect of destabilization heat treatment route and erodent powder type on the erosive wear behavior of two commercial hypereutectic white cast irons. The as-received and the heat-treated materials were analyzed through optical and scanning electron microscopy, hardness tests, and X-ray diffraction to determine the relationship between microstructural variations and applied heat treatment. The erosive resistance was evaluated per the ASTM G76 standard in a purpose-built air blast test rig. Experiments were performed considering a raw meal powder, commonly used in cement factories, and Al2O3 as erodent powders. The adopted heat treatments were effective in increasing the overall hardness of the material, but this was not directly related to the erosion resistance. By contrast, the relative hardness ratio, i.e., erodent/target hardness, affects the erosion rate and different behaviors in relation to the softer/harder erodent particles were found.
Fortini, A; Suman, A; Zanini, N; Cruciani, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2497498
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