Given the rising numbers of older people living with dementia, this study focuses on identifying modifiable health-related factors associated with changes in cognitive status. The predictors of 1-year conversion from Preserved Cognitive Health (PCH) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in older adults were evaluated. Two logistic regression models were performed on data from an Italian multicenter population-based study; both included sociodemographic factors, family history of dementia (FHD), risk behaviors, and depressive symptoms. The first model considered also disease clusters, while the second one included diseases' number and biochemical parameters. The sample involved 459 participants (61.4% women, median age 75 years). Of the 80 PCH individuals at baseline, after 1 year 35 (43.8%) were stable, 44 (55.0%) progressed to MCI, none to dementia, and one to unclassified status. Of the 379 MCI participants at baseline, after 1 year 281 (74.1%) remained stable, 38 (10.0%) reverted to PCH, 15 (4.0%) progressed to dementia, and 45 (11.9%) become unclassifiable. Hypertension/bone and joint diseases cluster was the only predictor of PCH progression to MCI; age and depression were associated with MCI progression to dementia; FHD was associated with MCI reversion to PCH. More diseases and fewer white blood cells were associated with MCI progression to dementia; more diseases and lower platelets were associated with the transition from MCI to unclassifiable; higher Na and lower TSH levels were associated with MCI reversion. The treatment or management of some chronic conditions and electrolyte imbalances may help attenuate cognitive deterioration in older adults with no or MCI.

Health-Related Predictors of Changes in Cognitive Status in Community-Dwelling Older Individuals

Caterina Trevisan
Co-primo
;
2022

Abstract

Given the rising numbers of older people living with dementia, this study focuses on identifying modifiable health-related factors associated with changes in cognitive status. The predictors of 1-year conversion from Preserved Cognitive Health (PCH) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in older adults were evaluated. Two logistic regression models were performed on data from an Italian multicenter population-based study; both included sociodemographic factors, family history of dementia (FHD), risk behaviors, and depressive symptoms. The first model considered also disease clusters, while the second one included diseases' number and biochemical parameters. The sample involved 459 participants (61.4% women, median age 75 years). Of the 80 PCH individuals at baseline, after 1 year 35 (43.8%) were stable, 44 (55.0%) progressed to MCI, none to dementia, and one to unclassified status. Of the 379 MCI participants at baseline, after 1 year 281 (74.1%) remained stable, 38 (10.0%) reverted to PCH, 15 (4.0%) progressed to dementia, and 45 (11.9%) become unclassifiable. Hypertension/bone and joint diseases cluster was the only predictor of PCH progression to MCI; age and depression were associated with MCI progression to dementia; FHD was associated with MCI reversion to PCH. More diseases and fewer white blood cells were associated with MCI progression to dementia; more diseases and lower platelets were associated with the transition from MCI to unclassifiable; higher Na and lower TSH levels were associated with MCI reversion. The treatment or management of some chronic conditions and electrolyte imbalances may help attenuate cognitive deterioration in older adults with no or MCI.
2022
Trevisan, Caterina; Siviero, Paola; Limongi, Federica; Noale, Marianna; Maggi, Stefania
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
fnagi-14-876359.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: versione editoriale
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 258.82 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
258.82 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2494595
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact