Objective: Frailty is a relatively new concept for intensivists, and is defined as a status of increased vulnerability to stressors associated with reduced reserve and function of different physiological systems. Supporting the hypothesis that frailty may be an important predictor of poor prognosis among older patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU), this study seeks to evaluate the association between frailty at ICU admission and short and long-term mortality. Design: An unmatched case-control study was carried out. Setting: Intensive Care Unit. Patients or participants: Patients ≥ 80 years of age admitted to the ICU for medical reasons. Interventions: None. Main variables of interest: The primary outcome was 30-day mortality, while secondary outcomes were ICU mortality and mortality at one year. Results: Most of the patients were classified as frail at ICU admission (55.3%). The prevalence of frailty was higher among those who died than in those who were alive within 30 days from ICU admission (62.3% vs 48.3%, p = 0.01). One-year mortality was higher in frail (84.4%) than in non-frail patients (65.2%, p < 0.001). In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders such as chronic diseases, clinical complexity, cause of ICU admission and use of advanced procedures, frailty was seen to be significantly associated to one-year mortality, but not with ICU mortality or 30-day mortality. Discussion: The admission of geriatric patients to the ICU is increasing. Frailty assessment may play an important role in the clinical evaluation of such individuals for triage, but should not be considered a priori as an exclusion criterion for admission.

The impact of frailty on mortality in older patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

Caterina Trevisan
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Objective: Frailty is a relatively new concept for intensivists, and is defined as a status of increased vulnerability to stressors associated with reduced reserve and function of different physiological systems. Supporting the hypothesis that frailty may be an important predictor of poor prognosis among older patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU), this study seeks to evaluate the association between frailty at ICU admission and short and long-term mortality. Design: An unmatched case-control study was carried out. Setting: Intensive Care Unit. Patients or participants: Patients ≥ 80 years of age admitted to the ICU for medical reasons. Interventions: None. Main variables of interest: The primary outcome was 30-day mortality, while secondary outcomes were ICU mortality and mortality at one year. Results: Most of the patients were classified as frail at ICU admission (55.3%). The prevalence of frailty was higher among those who died than in those who were alive within 30 days from ICU admission (62.3% vs 48.3%, p = 0.01). One-year mortality was higher in frail (84.4%) than in non-frail patients (65.2%, p < 0.001). In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders such as chronic diseases, clinical complexity, cause of ICU admission and use of advanced procedures, frailty was seen to be significantly associated to one-year mortality, but not with ICU mortality or 30-day mortality. Discussion: The admission of geriatric patients to the ICU is increasing. Frailty assessment may play an important role in the clinical evaluation of such individuals for triage, but should not be considered a priori as an exclusion criterion for admission.
2022
Pasin, Laura; Boraso, Sabrina; Golino, Gianlorenzo; Safaee Fakhr, Bijan; Tiberio, Ivo; Trevisan, Caterina
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2494594
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