Background: Balance and mobility impairments are frequent in people with multiple sclerosis, partly due to cerebellar dysfunctions. Task-oriented behavioural approaches were previously shown to promote physical function. The possibility exists that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (ctDCS) applied during training, known to increase the excitability of the brain, can boost rehabilitation effects through modulation of cerebellum-brain inhibition. Objective: To test the efficacy of cerebellar ctDCS stimulation combined with motor training on mobility and balance in people with multiple sclerosis. Methods: 16 subjects were randomly assigned to receive real- or sham-ctDCS and task-oriented training daily over two weeks in a double-blind, randomised clinical pilot trial. Functional mobility, balance, walking performance and quality of life were tested before and after treatment and at two-week follow-up. Effects of cerebellar stimulation on psychological and executive functions were also recorded. Results: Walking performance, balance and quality of life improved for both groups at post-treatment assessment which was maintained at 2-weeks follow up. A two-way ANOVA revealed a significant time effect for balance and walking performance. A significant interaction effect of time-treatment (F = 3.12, df = 2,26; p = 0.03) was found for motor aspects of quality of life assessment in patients who received real-ctDCS. Conclusions: Task-oriented training improves balance and mobility in people with multiple sclerosis, but ctDCS does not boost motor training effects.

Combined effects of cerebellar tDCS and task-oriented circuit training in people with multiple sclerosis: A pilot randomized control trial

Baroni A.
Primo
;
Milani G.;Straudi S.
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Background: Balance and mobility impairments are frequent in people with multiple sclerosis, partly due to cerebellar dysfunctions. Task-oriented behavioural approaches were previously shown to promote physical function. The possibility exists that cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (ctDCS) applied during training, known to increase the excitability of the brain, can boost rehabilitation effects through modulation of cerebellum-brain inhibition. Objective: To test the efficacy of cerebellar ctDCS stimulation combined with motor training on mobility and balance in people with multiple sclerosis. Methods: 16 subjects were randomly assigned to receive real- or sham-ctDCS and task-oriented training daily over two weeks in a double-blind, randomised clinical pilot trial. Functional mobility, balance, walking performance and quality of life were tested before and after treatment and at two-week follow-up. Effects of cerebellar stimulation on psychological and executive functions were also recorded. Results: Walking performance, balance and quality of life improved for both groups at post-treatment assessment which was maintained at 2-weeks follow up. A two-way ANOVA revealed a significant time effect for balance and walking performance. A significant interaction effect of time-treatment (F = 3.12, df = 2,26; p = 0.03) was found for motor aspects of quality of life assessment in patients who received real-ctDCS. Conclusions: Task-oriented training improves balance and mobility in people with multiple sclerosis, but ctDCS does not boost motor training effects.
2022
Baroni, A.; Magro, G.; Martinuzzi, C.; Brondi, L.; Masiero, S.; Milani, G.; Zani, G.; Bergonzoni, A.; Basaglia, N.; Straudi, S.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
hdl 113922493159.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: Full text ahead of print
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 757.27 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
757.27 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
hdl 113922493159 pre-print.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Pre-print
Tipologia: Pre-print
Licenza: PUBBLICO - Pubblico con Copyright
Dimensione 338.49 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
338.49 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in SFERA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2493159
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 4
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact