Parabens are classified as endocrine disrupting chemicals due to their ability to activate several nuclear receptors causing changes in hormones-dependent signalling pathways. Central nervous system of developing organisms is particularly vulnerable to changes in hormonal pathways, which could lead to altered brain function, abnormal behaviour and even diseases later in life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exposure to butylparaben (BuP), ethylparaben (EtP) and methylparaben (MeP) during early development on nervous system using zebrafish larvae's behavioural models. Zebrafish were exposed until 4 days post fertilization (dpf) to three concentrations of each paraben chosen considering the environmentally realistic concentrations of human exposure and the benchmark-dose lower bound calculated for zebrafish larvae (BuP: 5, 50 and 500 μg/L; EtP: 50, 500 and 5000 μg/L; MeP: 100, 1000 and 10,000 μg/L). Activity in novel and in familiar environment, thigmotaxis, visual startle response and photic synchronization of the behavioural circadian rhythms were analysed at 4, 5 and 6 dpf. Zebrafish larvae exposed to BuP 500 μg/L and EtP 5000 μg/L revealed increased anxiety-like behaviour in novel environment. Larvae treated with 500 μg/L of BuP showed reduced activity in familiar and marginally in unfamiliar environment, and larvae exposed to 5000 μg/L of EtP exhibited hyperactivity in familiar environment. Parabens exposure did not influence the visual startle response and the photic synchronization of circadian rhythms in zebrafish larvae. This research highlighted as the exposure to parabens has the potential to interfere with behavioural development of zebrafish.

Behavioural effects of early-life exposure to parabens in zebrafish larvae

Lucon Xiccato T.
Co-primo
;
Bertolucci C.
Penultimo
;
2021

Abstract

Parabens are classified as endocrine disrupting chemicals due to their ability to activate several nuclear receptors causing changes in hormones-dependent signalling pathways. Central nervous system of developing organisms is particularly vulnerable to changes in hormonal pathways, which could lead to altered brain function, abnormal behaviour and even diseases later in life. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exposure to butylparaben (BuP), ethylparaben (EtP) and methylparaben (MeP) during early development on nervous system using zebrafish larvae's behavioural models. Zebrafish were exposed until 4 days post fertilization (dpf) to three concentrations of each paraben chosen considering the environmentally realistic concentrations of human exposure and the benchmark-dose lower bound calculated for zebrafish larvae (BuP: 5, 50 and 500 μg/L; EtP: 50, 500 and 5000 μg/L; MeP: 100, 1000 and 10,000 μg/L). Activity in novel and in familiar environment, thigmotaxis, visual startle response and photic synchronization of the behavioural circadian rhythms were analysed at 4, 5 and 6 dpf. Zebrafish larvae exposed to BuP 500 μg/L and EtP 5000 μg/L revealed increased anxiety-like behaviour in novel environment. Larvae treated with 500 μg/L of BuP showed reduced activity in familiar and marginally in unfamiliar environment, and larvae exposed to 5000 μg/L of EtP exhibited hyperactivity in familiar environment. Parabens exposure did not influence the visual startle response and the photic synchronization of circadian rhythms in zebrafish larvae. This research highlighted as the exposure to parabens has the potential to interfere with behavioural development of zebrafish.
Merola, C.; Lucon Xiccato, T.; Bertolucci, C.; Perugini, M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2478174
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