Background: In the prospective population-based Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), comprising 113 754 offspring, we investigated the association between parental exposure to “gasoline or exhaust”, as a proxy for benzene exposure, and childhood leukaemia. Methods: Around gestational week 17, mothers and fathers responded to a questionnaire on exposure to various agents during the last 6 months and 6 months pre-conception, respectively. Benzene exposure was assessed through self-reported exposure to “gasoline or exhaust”. Cases of childhood leukaemia (n = 70) were identified through linkage with the Cancer Registry of Norway. Risk was estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), comparing offspring from exposed and unexposed parents using a Cox regression model. Results: Maternal exposure to "gasoline or exhaust" was associated with an increased risk of childhood leukaemia (HR = 2.59; 95%CI: 1.03, 6.48) and acute lymphatic leukaemia (HR = 2.71; 95%CI: 0.97, 7.58). There was an increasing risk for higher exposure (p value for trend = 0.032 and 0.027). The association did not change after adjustment for maternal smoking. Conclusion: In spite of rather few cases, the findings in this prospective study, with the exposure metric defined a priori, support previous observations relating maternal exposure to benzene from gasoline and other petroleum-derived sources and the subsequent development of childhood leukaemia in the offspring.

Maternal exposure to gasoline and exhaust increases the risk of childhood leukaemia in offspring – a prospective study in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

Mattioli, Stefano
Methodology
;
2018

Abstract

Background: In the prospective population-based Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), comprising 113 754 offspring, we investigated the association between parental exposure to “gasoline or exhaust”, as a proxy for benzene exposure, and childhood leukaemia. Methods: Around gestational week 17, mothers and fathers responded to a questionnaire on exposure to various agents during the last 6 months and 6 months pre-conception, respectively. Benzene exposure was assessed through self-reported exposure to “gasoline or exhaust”. Cases of childhood leukaemia (n = 70) were identified through linkage with the Cancer Registry of Norway. Risk was estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), comparing offspring from exposed and unexposed parents using a Cox regression model. Results: Maternal exposure to "gasoline or exhaust" was associated with an increased risk of childhood leukaemia (HR = 2.59; 95%CI: 1.03, 6.48) and acute lymphatic leukaemia (HR = 2.71; 95%CI: 0.97, 7.58). There was an increasing risk for higher exposure (p value for trend = 0.032 and 0.027). The association did not change after adjustment for maternal smoking. Conclusion: In spite of rather few cases, the findings in this prospective study, with the exposure metric defined a priori, support previous observations relating maternal exposure to benzene from gasoline and other petroleum-derived sources and the subsequent development of childhood leukaemia in the offspring.
2018
Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Riise, Trond; Bjørge, Tone; Christiani, David C.; Bråtveit, Magne; Baccarelli, Andrea; Mattioli, Stefano; Hollund, Bjørg Eli; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
kirkeleit 2018.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Full text editoriale
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 316.47 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
316.47 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in SFERA sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2476229
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 4
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact