Background: Thyroid surgery, performed for benign or malignant pathologies, is one of the most frequently performed procedures and its frequency has even been increasing in recent years. Postoperative bleeding, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy, associated to dysphonia, dysphagia, dyspnea, and hypoparathyroidism represent the most fearful and common complications. We conducted a multicenter, observational study of retrospectively collected data in three high-volume referral centers, enrolling all patients undergone to thyroid surgery between January 2016 and December 2017 in Parma University Hospital, Cagliari University Hospital and Ferrara University Hospital. Materials: Patients were divided into five groups, differentiated thyroid carcinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, non-toxic benign pathology, hyperfunctioning benign pathology and NIFTP (Non-invasive Follicular Thyroid neoplasm with Papillary-like nuclear features). A follow up at 7 and 30 days was executed, evaluating the onset of paresthesia, dysphonia and dysphagia. A 6-month follow-up was conducted in cases of early complications. Results: Totally, 1252 patients were eligible for the study: 907 female and 345 male, with a female to male ratio of 2.6:1 and an average age of 53.428. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 1022 cases, lobectomy in 230. After 6 months we recorded paresthesia in 0.5%, dysphonia in 1.8% and dysphagia in 0.5%. Conclusion: Our study confirms once again that a share of morbidity escapes the possibilities of prediction and control by the operator, depending on patient anamnestic, pathological or anatomical factors.

Adverse events in thyroid surgery: observational study in three surgical units with high volume/year

Carcoforo P.
Primo
;
Koleva Radica M.
Ultimo
;
2021

Abstract

Background: Thyroid surgery, performed for benign or malignant pathologies, is one of the most frequently performed procedures and its frequency has even been increasing in recent years. Postoperative bleeding, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy, associated to dysphonia, dysphagia, dyspnea, and hypoparathyroidism represent the most fearful and common complications. We conducted a multicenter, observational study of retrospectively collected data in three high-volume referral centers, enrolling all patients undergone to thyroid surgery between January 2016 and December 2017 in Parma University Hospital, Cagliari University Hospital and Ferrara University Hospital. Materials: Patients were divided into five groups, differentiated thyroid carcinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma, non-toxic benign pathology, hyperfunctioning benign pathology and NIFTP (Non-invasive Follicular Thyroid neoplasm with Papillary-like nuclear features). A follow up at 7 and 30 days was executed, evaluating the onset of paresthesia, dysphonia and dysphagia. A 6-month follow-up was conducted in cases of early complications. Results: Totally, 1252 patients were eligible for the study: 907 female and 345 male, with a female to male ratio of 2.6:1 and an average age of 53.428. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 1022 cases, lobectomy in 230. After 6 months we recorded paresthesia in 0.5%, dysphonia in 1.8% and dysphagia in 0.5%. Conclusion: Our study confirms once again that a share of morbidity escapes the possibilities of prediction and control by the operator, depending on patient anamnestic, pathological or anatomical factors.
Del Rio, P.; Carcoforo, P.; Medas, F.; Bonati, E.; Loderer, T.; Koleva Radica, M.; Calo, P.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2474801
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