This book presents the strengths and weaknesses of the Italian model of inclusive education within a wider framework, that of the international movement for inclusion in education. Both the international organizations and the academic world are advocating for more inclusive education systems, where people’s minds and hearts are taught the beauty and the immense potential of diversity. In this global context, Italy is only a tile of a mosaic, made of many different pedagogical traditions, policies and practices. New perspectives come from this intercultural debate, together with feedback and increased awareness of the results so far obtained. Chapter 1 analyses the concept of “inclusion” in education from an international perspective, considering the landmarks in its evolution over time and the many different meanings given to it in the current debate. Inclusive education has been widely recognized, in the international debate, as a human right: consequently, international organisations and governments have been asserting that schools must be inclusive, recognising and responding to the diverse needs of their students. In spite of the unanimous acceptance and sharing of this principle, there is still a lack of consensus about the real meaning of inclusive education and its concrete implications in terms of policies and practices. Worldwide, there are many different conceptualizations of the notion of inclusive education, on a continuum between the two theoretical models of integration (reductionist paradigm) and inclusion (systemic paradigm). After setting the scene, the chapter describes in detail the five main approaches to inclusive education in Europe. The concept of disability is discussed in chapter 2, starting from the definition given by the UN in 2006 which emphasises the importance of the interaction between a person, with his/her own physical, mental and psychological characteristics, and the environment. Different theoretical approaches to disability are described, as well as their implications in terms of policies and practices. Going back in time, the chapter tracks the origins and development of the social model of disability from which the subdiscipline called disability studies has developed over the last four decades. It explains why this approach differs radically from the individual/medical model of disability, which was prevalent before the 1980s, and how this new perspective on disability may change the concept of inclusive education and the research work in the field. Chapter 3 describes the historical evolution of the Italian model of inclusive education and the factors that influenced its development until recent times. After going over the history of the Italian education system, its current structure and characteristics, the chapter illustrates the main steps in the development of a legislation supporting inclusive education and specifically the integration of students with disabilities in mainstream school settings. The process began much earlier than in most other European nations. It is rooted in the political and social history of a country that, since its unification, had to deal with profound diversities and fractures. In this context, the policy for integrazione scolastica introduced starting in the 1970s was not an isolated fact; rather, it appeared as one of the tiles of a broader political and civic movement, concerned with safeguarding constitutional rights, limiting political conflicts and, ultimately, increasing social justice. Some important Italian pedagogues played a crucial role in the development of educational theories supporting inclusive education. Their stories are narrated in chapter 4. These figures were quite different in many ways, but largely similar in their drive towards social justice and in their faith in education as a powerful instrument for social change. Their strong messages contributed to the development of educational theories supporting inclusive education. Their heritage lives in the model of inclusive education that Italy developed starting in the seventies. And yet, even if we’ve come a long way since then, their challenges to an unequal society, and to a conservative education system that feeds it, are still relevant today. Chapter 5 describes how the legislative framework for school inclusion translates into policies and practices at the school level. Moreover, it discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the Italian model of inclusive education, referring to the relevant academic literature at the national and international level. The role of support teachers, specialised assistants, communication assistants and other figures dedicated to implementing inclusion practices within schools are described. Then, the chapter explains the different categories of special educational needs recognised by the Italian legislation and goes over the main contents of an Individualised educational plan (PEI) and a Personalised didactic plan (PDP). Finally, it presents the current main findings of research in the field of inclusive education. Over the past several decades, migration processes have impacted Italian schools. Nowadays, in many areas of the country, schools are multicultural: newly arrived immigrants from diverse backgrounds, together with second generation immigrants, make up significant percentages of the total enrollment. This constant evolution poses new challenges for the education system and its inclusiveness. Chapter 6 describes the policies implemented in the education system to manage this new reality, aimed at valuing diversity in cultural origins and backgrounds. It also presents the theoretical model behind such policies, tracing its roots in the Italian tradition of inclusiveness in education. However, educational policies are not the only necessary tool for building a really inclusive school. Many “foreign“ students have spent their whole life in Italy, but they can’t be fully integrated in society until their right to citizenship is recognized. Recent proposals to reform citizenship laws have been rejected, leaving an alarming void in integration policies. Chapter 7 describes the observable trends in inclusive education policies and practices in European countries and the main areas of improvement, drawing mainly on research findings made available by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (EASNIE), an independent organization that acts as a platform for collaboration among its member countries, working towards ensuring more inclusive education systems. The EASNIE is the only European body maintained by member countries with the specific mission of helping them improve the quality and effectiveness of their inclusive education provisions for all learners. Due to methodological issues, indicators on inclusive education are hardly comparable, except for those concerning different forms of segregated provisions. In spite of a clear and widely shared policy framework, European countries have reached different levels of inclusiveness in their education systems. School segregation is still common in many countries and this can translate into serious damage to the quality of education systems. It is essential for governments to commit to reforms aimed at creating schools that are fully inclusive, as stated in the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. An overview of the policies implemented in Italy for monitoring, assessing and evaluating inclusion in educational setting is provided in chapter 8, that also describes the EASNIE guidelines and indicators for correct and effective assessment of school inclusion in member states. The importance of assessing and evaluating inclusion is widely shared among European countries and, along with this commitment, both academics and the international policymakers have proposed models and indicators. Assessment and evaluation can be done both at the system level and at the level of individual schools, where it can be internal (self assessment and evaluation) and external. In Italy, systemic evaluation processes are in a phase of change and inclusion has been recently introduced among the indicators to be monitored for external evaluation. In Europe, countries adopt different policies, but the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education has worked with a bottom up approach to collect all members’ experiences and opinions and has finally issued guidelines and indicators. At the level of individual schools, the most authoritative framework for self assessment and evaluation is the Index for Inclusion, an internationally validated tool for measuring the level of inclusiveness in the school environment, which takes the social disability model as a theoretical reference, focusing its analysis on barriers to learning and participation. In chapter 9 the main concepts extensively covered in the book are summarized, and the analysis is enriched with theoretical reflections coming from authoritative literature. Italy has come a long way since the dawn of school inclusion and has reached important goals. However, light and shadow live together in the reality of today’s schools. While building social cohesion becomes more and more of a priority every day, the risks of marginalisation for many groups becomes higher as well. After deconstructing Italian policies and discussing the “shadows” that lie over them, the chapter reiterates the crucial areas to construct effective policies. Finally, chapter 10 is an original contribution from a university professor who has also worked as a school teacher when the policy of integrazione scolastica was moving its first steps. It is a reflection on the role of educators struggling with a world that seems to construct diversity in order to fix it, in a perverse cycle guided by blind rationality. The conclusion is a proposal to look at diversity, and inclusion, in a new light.

Il lavoro ha l’obiettivo di presentare, in particolare ad un lettore non italiano, le caratteristiche del nostro modello di scuola inclusiva, il suo sviluppo storico, i suoi punti di forza e di debolezza all’interno di una cornice più ampia, quella del movimento internazionale per l’educazione inclusiva. Il libro è diviso in dieci capitoli. Il capitolo 1 analizza il concetto di inclusione educativa in una prospettiva internazionale, ripercorrendo le tappe fondamentali della sua evoluzione nel tempo e i diversi significati che ha assunto nel dibattito contemporaneo. Nonostante l’unanime accettazione e condivisione del principio di inclusione educativa, manca ancora un consenso rispetto al reale significato dell’educazione inclusiva e alle sue implicazioni concrete in termini di politiche e pratiche. Nel mondo, ci sono diverse concettualizzazioni del termine “educazione inclusiva” lungo un continuum tra due modelli teorici, l’integrazione (paradigma riduzionista) e l’inclusione (paradigma sistemico). Il concetto di disabilità viene discusso nel capitolo 2, a partire dalla definizione data dall’ONU nel 2006 che enfatizza l’importanza dell’interazione tra la persona, con le sue caratteristiche fisiche, mentali e psicologiche, e l’ambiente. Vengono descritti i diversi approcci teorici alla disabilità e le loro implicazioni in termini di politiche e pratiche. Guardando al passato, il capitolo traccia le origini e lo sviluppo del modello sociale della disabilità da cui è nato e si è sviluppato negli ultimi quarant’anni l’approccio dei disability studies. Si spiega perché questa prospettiva differisce radicalmente dal modello individuale/medico della disabilità, prevalente prima degli anni ’80, e come essa può cambiare il concetto di inclusione in educazione e la ricerca in questo campo. Il capitolo 3 descrive l’evoluzione storica del modello di educazione inclusiva nel nostro paese e i fattori che ne hanno determinato lo sviluppo, fino ai giorni nostri. Dopo aver ripercorso le principali tappe della storia del sistema scolastico, e la sua attuale struttura, il capitolo illustra i passaggi principali della produzione normativa a favore dell’inclusione scolastica e, nello specifico, dell’inserimento degli studenti con disabilità nella scuola di tutti. Questo processo, iniziato in Italia molto prima che in altri paesi europei, è radicato nella storia politica e sociale di una nazione che, fin dalla sua nascita, ha dovuto gestire profonde diversità e fratture. In un tale contesto, la politica di integrazione scolastica non è stata un fatto isolato, bensì è apparsa come una tessera di mosaico nell’ambito di un ampio movimento politico e sociale teso alla salvaguardia dei diritti costituzionali, al contenimento dei conflitti politici e, in ultima analisi, al miglioramento della giustizia sociale. Alcuni pedagogisti italiani hanno giocato un ruolo cruciale nello sviluppo di teorie educative a supporto dell’educazione inclusiva. Le loro storie sono raccontate nel capitolo 4. Queste figure erano molto diverse da numerosi punti di vista, ma anche molto simili per il loro impegno verso la giustizia sociale e per la loro fede nell’educazione come potente strumento di cambiamento sociale. Il capitolo 5 approfondisce le modalità con cui il quadro normativo si traduce in politiche e pratiche a livello di istituti scolastici. Inoltre, analizza i punti di forza e di debolezza del modello italiano di scuola inclusiva facendo riferimento alla letteratura scientifica nazionale e internazionale. Infine, viene riportato lo stato dell’arte e i principali risultati della ricerca sull’educazione inclusiva. Il capitolo 6 descrive le politiche disegnate per gestire e valorizzare la diversità delle origini culturali e dei percorsi di vita di tutti gli alunni. Viene presentato anche il modello teorico sotteso a queste politiche, che affonda le sue radici nella nostra tradizione pedagogica inclusiva. Tuttavia, le politiche educative non sono l’unico strumento necessario per costruire una scuola realmente inclusiva. Molti studenti nelle nostre scuole hanno trascorso la loro intera vita in Italia, ma non possono essere pienamente integrati nella società fino a che non viene riconosciuta loro la cittadinanza. Le recenti proposte di riforma della legge sulla cittadinanza sono state respinte, lasciando un vuoto allarmante nelle politiche per l’integrazione. In Europa le scelte riguardanti i sistemi educativi e l’inclusione sono molto diverse, è possibile tuttavia identificare alcune tendenze comuni nelle politiche e nelle pratiche e alcune aree da rafforzare. Questi aspetti sono trattati nel capitolo 7, a partire dai dati della European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (EASNIE), un’organizzazione indipendente che ha il compito di favorire la collaborazione tra gli stati membri per la creazione di sistemi educativi più inclusivi. A causa di problemi di natura metodologica, gli indicatori sull’educazione inclusiva sono difficilmente comparabili, eccetto quelli riguardanti le diverse forme di “segregazione” educativa. Nonostante vi sia un quadro di linee guida molto chiaro e ampiamente condiviso, i paesi Europei hanno raggiunto finora livelli di inclusività molto diversi nei loro sistemi educativi. Nel capitolo 8 viene proposta una panoramica delle politiche italiane per il monitoraggio e la valutazione dell’inclusione nei contesti educativi, oltre ad una descrizione delle linee guida e degli indicatori diffusi dalla European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (EASNIE) per la valutazione corretta ed efficace dell’inclusività dei sistemi scolastici. In Italia, l’inclusività, già presente tra gli indicatori per l’autovalutazione delle scuole, è stata di recente inserita tra gli aspetti da considerare anche nella valutazione esterna. In Europa, i paesi adottano diverse politiche, ma l’Agenzia ha lavorato con un approccio bottom up per raccogliere le opinioni e le esperienze dei paesi membri, arrivando a proporre delle linee guida e degli indicatori. A livello di singola scuola, la metodologia più autorevole è proposta all’interno dell’Index per l’inclusione, uno strumento validato a livello internazionale per misurare l’inclusività di una ambiente scolastico. L’Index prende ha come riferimento teorico il modello sociale della disabilità, focalizzandosi quindi sulle barriere all’apprendimento e alla partecipazione. Il capitolo 9 riprende i principali concetti esposti nel testo arricchendo l’analisi con autorevoli contributi teorici. L’Italia ha fatto molta strada dall’alba dell’inclusione scolastica e ha raggiunto importanti risultati. Tuttavia, luci ed ombre convivono nella realtà delle scuole di oggi. Mentre la coesione sociale diventa sempre più una priorità ogni giorno, aumentano anche i rischi di marginalizzazione dei gruppi più svantaggiati. Dopo aver decostruito le politiche italiane e discusso le ombre che minacciano l’inclusività della scuola italiana, saranno approfonditi i punti principali cui prestare attenzione per la costruzione di politiche efficaci. Infine, il capitolo 10 offre l’originale contributo di un Professore universitario che è stato anche insegnante quando la politica dell’integrazione scolastica muoveva i suoi primi passi. E’ una riflessione sul ruolo dell’educatore alle prese con un mondo che sembra costruire diversità per poi “correggerle”, innescando un circolo vizioso guidato da una razionalità cieca. La conclusione è una proposta, che consiste nel vedere la diversità, così come l’inclusione, in una luce nuova.

Inclusive education. A critical view on Italian policies

Silvia Zanazzi
2018

Abstract

Il lavoro ha l’obiettivo di presentare, in particolare ad un lettore non italiano, le caratteristiche del nostro modello di scuola inclusiva, il suo sviluppo storico, i suoi punti di forza e di debolezza all’interno di una cornice più ampia, quella del movimento internazionale per l’educazione inclusiva. Il libro è diviso in dieci capitoli. Il capitolo 1 analizza il concetto di inclusione educativa in una prospettiva internazionale, ripercorrendo le tappe fondamentali della sua evoluzione nel tempo e i diversi significati che ha assunto nel dibattito contemporaneo. Nonostante l’unanime accettazione e condivisione del principio di inclusione educativa, manca ancora un consenso rispetto al reale significato dell’educazione inclusiva e alle sue implicazioni concrete in termini di politiche e pratiche. Nel mondo, ci sono diverse concettualizzazioni del termine “educazione inclusiva” lungo un continuum tra due modelli teorici, l’integrazione (paradigma riduzionista) e l’inclusione (paradigma sistemico). Il concetto di disabilità viene discusso nel capitolo 2, a partire dalla definizione data dall’ONU nel 2006 che enfatizza l’importanza dell’interazione tra la persona, con le sue caratteristiche fisiche, mentali e psicologiche, e l’ambiente. Vengono descritti i diversi approcci teorici alla disabilità e le loro implicazioni in termini di politiche e pratiche. Guardando al passato, il capitolo traccia le origini e lo sviluppo del modello sociale della disabilità da cui è nato e si è sviluppato negli ultimi quarant’anni l’approccio dei disability studies. Si spiega perché questa prospettiva differisce radicalmente dal modello individuale/medico della disabilità, prevalente prima degli anni ’80, e come essa può cambiare il concetto di inclusione in educazione e la ricerca in questo campo. Il capitolo 3 descrive l’evoluzione storica del modello di educazione inclusiva nel nostro paese e i fattori che ne hanno determinato lo sviluppo, fino ai giorni nostri. Dopo aver ripercorso le principali tappe della storia del sistema scolastico, e la sua attuale struttura, il capitolo illustra i passaggi principali della produzione normativa a favore dell’inclusione scolastica e, nello specifico, dell’inserimento degli studenti con disabilità nella scuola di tutti. Questo processo, iniziato in Italia molto prima che in altri paesi europei, è radicato nella storia politica e sociale di una nazione che, fin dalla sua nascita, ha dovuto gestire profonde diversità e fratture. In un tale contesto, la politica di integrazione scolastica non è stata un fatto isolato, bensì è apparsa come una tessera di mosaico nell’ambito di un ampio movimento politico e sociale teso alla salvaguardia dei diritti costituzionali, al contenimento dei conflitti politici e, in ultima analisi, al miglioramento della giustizia sociale. Alcuni pedagogisti italiani hanno giocato un ruolo cruciale nello sviluppo di teorie educative a supporto dell’educazione inclusiva. Le loro storie sono raccontate nel capitolo 4. Queste figure erano molto diverse da numerosi punti di vista, ma anche molto simili per il loro impegno verso la giustizia sociale e per la loro fede nell’educazione come potente strumento di cambiamento sociale. Il capitolo 5 approfondisce le modalità con cui il quadro normativo si traduce in politiche e pratiche a livello di istituti scolastici. Inoltre, analizza i punti di forza e di debolezza del modello italiano di scuola inclusiva facendo riferimento alla letteratura scientifica nazionale e internazionale. Infine, viene riportato lo stato dell’arte e i principali risultati della ricerca sull’educazione inclusiva. Il capitolo 6 descrive le politiche disegnate per gestire e valorizzare la diversità delle origini culturali e dei percorsi di vita di tutti gli alunni. Viene presentato anche il modello teorico sotteso a queste politiche, che affonda le sue radici nella nostra tradizione pedagogica inclusiva. Tuttavia, le politiche educative non sono l’unico strumento necessario per costruire una scuola realmente inclusiva. Molti studenti nelle nostre scuole hanno trascorso la loro intera vita in Italia, ma non possono essere pienamente integrati nella società fino a che non viene riconosciuta loro la cittadinanza. Le recenti proposte di riforma della legge sulla cittadinanza sono state respinte, lasciando un vuoto allarmante nelle politiche per l’integrazione. In Europa le scelte riguardanti i sistemi educativi e l’inclusione sono molto diverse, è possibile tuttavia identificare alcune tendenze comuni nelle politiche e nelle pratiche e alcune aree da rafforzare. Questi aspetti sono trattati nel capitolo 7, a partire dai dati della European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (EASNIE), un’organizzazione indipendente che ha il compito di favorire la collaborazione tra gli stati membri per la creazione di sistemi educativi più inclusivi. A causa di problemi di natura metodologica, gli indicatori sull’educazione inclusiva sono difficilmente comparabili, eccetto quelli riguardanti le diverse forme di “segregazione” educativa. Nonostante vi sia un quadro di linee guida molto chiaro e ampiamente condiviso, i paesi Europei hanno raggiunto finora livelli di inclusività molto diversi nei loro sistemi educativi. Nel capitolo 8 viene proposta una panoramica delle politiche italiane per il monitoraggio e la valutazione dell’inclusione nei contesti educativi, oltre ad una descrizione delle linee guida e degli indicatori diffusi dalla European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (EASNIE) per la valutazione corretta ed efficace dell’inclusività dei sistemi scolastici. In Italia, l’inclusività, già presente tra gli indicatori per l’autovalutazione delle scuole, è stata di recente inserita tra gli aspetti da considerare anche nella valutazione esterna. In Europa, i paesi adottano diverse politiche, ma l’Agenzia ha lavorato con un approccio bottom up per raccogliere le opinioni e le esperienze dei paesi membri, arrivando a proporre delle linee guida e degli indicatori. A livello di singola scuola, la metodologia più autorevole è proposta all’interno dell’Index per l’inclusione, uno strumento validato a livello internazionale per misurare l’inclusività di una ambiente scolastico. L’Index prende ha come riferimento teorico il modello sociale della disabilità, focalizzandosi quindi sulle barriere all’apprendimento e alla partecipazione. Il capitolo 9 riprende i principali concetti esposti nel testo arricchendo l’analisi con autorevoli contributi teorici. L’Italia ha fatto molta strada dall’alba dell’inclusione scolastica e ha raggiunto importanti risultati. Tuttavia, luci ed ombre convivono nella realtà delle scuole di oggi. Mentre la coesione sociale diventa sempre più una priorità ogni giorno, aumentano anche i rischi di marginalizzazione dei gruppi più svantaggiati. Dopo aver decostruito le politiche italiane e discusso le ombre che minacciano l’inclusività della scuola italiana, saranno approfonditi i punti principali cui prestare attenzione per la costruzione di politiche efficaci. Infine, il capitolo 10 offre l’originale contributo di un Professore universitario che è stato anche insegnante quando la politica dell’integrazione scolastica muoveva i suoi primi passi. E’ una riflessione sul ruolo dell’educatore alle prese con un mondo che sembra costruire diversità per poi “correggerle”, innescando un circolo vizioso guidato da una razionalità cieca. La conclusione è una proposta, che consiste nel vedere la diversità, così come l’inclusione, in una luce nuova.
9788833650029
This book presents the strengths and weaknesses of the Italian model of inclusive education within a wider framework, that of the international movement for inclusion in education. Both the international organizations and the academic world are advocating for more inclusive education systems, where people’s minds and hearts are taught the beauty and the immense potential of diversity. In this global context, Italy is only a tile of a mosaic, made of many different pedagogical traditions, policies and practices. New perspectives come from this intercultural debate, together with feedback and increased awareness of the results so far obtained. Chapter 1 analyses the concept of “inclusion” in education from an international perspective, considering the landmarks in its evolution over time and the many different meanings given to it in the current debate. Inclusive education has been widely recognized, in the international debate, as a human right: consequently, international organisations and governments have been asserting that schools must be inclusive, recognising and responding to the diverse needs of their students. In spite of the unanimous acceptance and sharing of this principle, there is still a lack of consensus about the real meaning of inclusive education and its concrete implications in terms of policies and practices. Worldwide, there are many different conceptualizations of the notion of inclusive education, on a continuum between the two theoretical models of integration (reductionist paradigm) and inclusion (systemic paradigm). After setting the scene, the chapter describes in detail the five main approaches to inclusive education in Europe. The concept of disability is discussed in chapter 2, starting from the definition given by the UN in 2006 which emphasises the importance of the interaction between a person, with his/her own physical, mental and psychological characteristics, and the environment. Different theoretical approaches to disability are described, as well as their implications in terms of policies and practices. Going back in time, the chapter tracks the origins and development of the social model of disability from which the subdiscipline called disability studies has developed over the last four decades. It explains why this approach differs radically from the individual/medical model of disability, which was prevalent before the 1980s, and how this new perspective on disability may change the concept of inclusive education and the research work in the field. Chapter 3 describes the historical evolution of the Italian model of inclusive education and the factors that influenced its development until recent times. After going over the history of the Italian education system, its current structure and characteristics, the chapter illustrates the main steps in the development of a legislation supporting inclusive education and specifically the integration of students with disabilities in mainstream school settings. The process began much earlier than in most other European nations. It is rooted in the political and social history of a country that, since its unification, had to deal with profound diversities and fractures. In this context, the policy for integrazione scolastica introduced starting in the 1970s was not an isolated fact; rather, it appeared as one of the tiles of a broader political and civic movement, concerned with safeguarding constitutional rights, limiting political conflicts and, ultimately, increasing social justice. Some important Italian pedagogues played a crucial role in the development of educational theories supporting inclusive education. Their stories are narrated in chapter 4. These figures were quite different in many ways, but largely similar in their drive towards social justice and in their faith in education as a powerful instrument for social change. Their strong messages contributed to the development of educational theories supporting inclusive education. Their heritage lives in the model of inclusive education that Italy developed starting in the seventies. And yet, even if we’ve come a long way since then, their challenges to an unequal society, and to a conservative education system that feeds it, are still relevant today. Chapter 5 describes how the legislative framework for school inclusion translates into policies and practices at the school level. Moreover, it discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the Italian model of inclusive education, referring to the relevant academic literature at the national and international level. The role of support teachers, specialised assistants, communication assistants and other figures dedicated to implementing inclusion practices within schools are described. Then, the chapter explains the different categories of special educational needs recognised by the Italian legislation and goes over the main contents of an Individualised educational plan (PEI) and a Personalised didactic plan (PDP). Finally, it presents the current main findings of research in the field of inclusive education. Over the past several decades, migration processes have impacted Italian schools. Nowadays, in many areas of the country, schools are multicultural: newly arrived immigrants from diverse backgrounds, together with second generation immigrants, make up significant percentages of the total enrollment. This constant evolution poses new challenges for the education system and its inclusiveness. Chapter 6 describes the policies implemented in the education system to manage this new reality, aimed at valuing diversity in cultural origins and backgrounds. It also presents the theoretical model behind such policies, tracing its roots in the Italian tradition of inclusiveness in education. However, educational policies are not the only necessary tool for building a really inclusive school. Many “foreign“ students have spent their whole life in Italy, but they can’t be fully integrated in society until their right to citizenship is recognized. Recent proposals to reform citizenship laws have been rejected, leaving an alarming void in integration policies. Chapter 7 describes the observable trends in inclusive education policies and practices in European countries and the main areas of improvement, drawing mainly on research findings made available by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education (EASNIE), an independent organization that acts as a platform for collaboration among its member countries, working towards ensuring more inclusive education systems. The EASNIE is the only European body maintained by member countries with the specific mission of helping them improve the quality and effectiveness of their inclusive education provisions for all learners. Due to methodological issues, indicators on inclusive education are hardly comparable, except for those concerning different forms of segregated provisions. In spite of a clear and widely shared policy framework, European countries have reached different levels of inclusiveness in their education systems. School segregation is still common in many countries and this can translate into serious damage to the quality of education systems. It is essential for governments to commit to reforms aimed at creating schools that are fully inclusive, as stated in the UN Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. An overview of the policies implemented in Italy for monitoring, assessing and evaluating inclusion in educational setting is provided in chapter 8, that also describes the EASNIE guidelines and indicators for correct and effective assessment of school inclusion in member states. The importance of assessing and evaluating inclusion is widely shared among European countries and, along with this commitment, both academics and the international policymakers have proposed models and indicators. Assessment and evaluation can be done both at the system level and at the level of individual schools, where it can be internal (self assessment and evaluation) and external. In Italy, systemic evaluation processes are in a phase of change and inclusion has been recently introduced among the indicators to be monitored for external evaluation. In Europe, countries adopt different policies, but the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education has worked with a bottom up approach to collect all members’ experiences and opinions and has finally issued guidelines and indicators. At the level of individual schools, the most authoritative framework for self assessment and evaluation is the Index for Inclusion, an internationally validated tool for measuring the level of inclusiveness in the school environment, which takes the social disability model as a theoretical reference, focusing its analysis on barriers to learning and participation. In chapter 9 the main concepts extensively covered in the book are summarized, and the analysis is enriched with theoretical reflections coming from authoritative literature. Italy has come a long way since the dawn of school inclusion and has reached important goals. However, light and shadow live together in the reality of today’s schools. While building social cohesion becomes more and more of a priority every day, the risks of marginalisation for many groups becomes higher as well. After deconstructing Italian policies and discussing the “shadows” that lie over them, the chapter reiterates the crucial areas to construct effective policies. Finally, chapter 10 is an original contribution from a university professor who has also worked as a school teacher when the policy of integrazione scolastica was moving its first steps. It is a reflection on the role of educators struggling with a world that seems to construct diversity in order to fix it, in a perverse cycle guided by blind rationality. The conclusion is a proposal to look at diversity, and inclusion, in a new light.
disability; inclusive education; Italy; school
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Zanazzi Inclusive Education.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Full text editoriale
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: PUBBLICO - Pubblico con Copyright
Dimensione 4.71 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
4.71 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/2460886
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact