Purines and their derivatives, most notably adenosine and ATP, are the key molecules controlling intracellular energy homoeostasis and nucleotide synthesis. Besides, these purines support, as chemical messengers, purinergic transmission throughout tissues and species. Purines act as endogenous ligands that bind to and activate plasmalemmal purinoceptors, which mediate extracellular communication referred to as “purinergic signalling”. Purinergic signalling is cross-linked with other transmitter networks to coordinate numerous aspects of cell behaviour such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and other physiological processes critical for the proper function of organisms. Pathological deregulation of purinergic signalling contributes to various diseases including neurodegeneration, rheumatic immune diseases, inflammation, and cancer. Particularly, gout is one of the most prevalent purine-related disease caused by purine metabolism disorder and consequent hyperuricemia. Compelling evidence indicates that purinoceptors are potential therapeutic targets, with specific purinergic agonists and antagonists demonstrating prominent therapeutic potential. Furthermore, dietary and herbal interventions help to restore and balance purine metabolism, thus addressing the importance of a healthy lifestyle in the prevention and relief of human disorders. Profound understanding of molecular mechanisms of purinergic signalling provides new and exciting insights into the treatment of human diseases.

From purines to purinergic signalling: molecular functions and human diseases

Di Virgilio F.;Ulrich H.;Verkhratsky A.;
2021

Abstract

Purines and their derivatives, most notably adenosine and ATP, are the key molecules controlling intracellular energy homoeostasis and nucleotide synthesis. Besides, these purines support, as chemical messengers, purinergic transmission throughout tissues and species. Purines act as endogenous ligands that bind to and activate plasmalemmal purinoceptors, which mediate extracellular communication referred to as “purinergic signalling”. Purinergic signalling is cross-linked with other transmitter networks to coordinate numerous aspects of cell behaviour such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and other physiological processes critical for the proper function of organisms. Pathological deregulation of purinergic signalling contributes to various diseases including neurodegeneration, rheumatic immune diseases, inflammation, and cancer. Particularly, gout is one of the most prevalent purine-related disease caused by purine metabolism disorder and consequent hyperuricemia. Compelling evidence indicates that purinoceptors are potential therapeutic targets, with specific purinergic agonists and antagonists demonstrating prominent therapeutic potential. Furthermore, dietary and herbal interventions help to restore and balance purine metabolism, thus addressing the importance of a healthy lifestyle in the prevention and relief of human disorders. Profound understanding of molecular mechanisms of purinergic signalling provides new and exciting insights into the treatment of human diseases.
2021
Huang, Z.; Xie, N.; Illes, P.; Di Virgilio, F.; Ulrich, H.; Semyanov, A.; Verkhratsky, A.; Sperlagh, B.; Yu, S. -G.; Huang, C.; Tang, Y.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2459426
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