Over 30 years after the publication of the list of 35 traits characterising the “medium [i.e., between formal and informal] register of Italian”, this sociolinguistic label is commonly accepted, although many researchers have improved and modified its description. However, teachers in Italian schools have not proven to be particularly sensitive to the widening gap between norm and usage and still teach a variety of Italian that is not found anywhere else but in the classroom. Unfortunately, insufficient research has been conducted so far on the differences between the norms that Italian native speakers learn in their school years and their actual linguistic behaviour. Which traits of the IUM (italiano dell’uso medio) pass unnoticed, which are detected but considered acceptable, and which are classified as mistakes are still up for debate. This study illustrates a survey involving native speakers of Italian coming from different geographical areas and social backgrounds who were invited to comment on the language used in newspaper articles containing IUM traits. Of course, this survey is part of a larger research project and is not considered to be exhaustive; however, it proves useful in testing the most effective procedures to administer the questionnaires and select the informants. In addition, preliminary results show a strong influence of the linguistic norm taught at school on the assessment not only of IUM traits but also of a range of other traits contributing to the linguistic reference model used by Italian native speakers.

Norma interiorizzata e uso: un’indagine preliminare su parlanti italiani

ROMANINI FABIO
Co-primo
Membro del Collaboration Group
2018

Abstract

Over 30 years after the publication of the list of 35 traits characterising the “medium [i.e., between formal and informal] register of Italian”, this sociolinguistic label is commonly accepted, although many researchers have improved and modified its description. However, teachers in Italian schools have not proven to be particularly sensitive to the widening gap between norm and usage and still teach a variety of Italian that is not found anywhere else but in the classroom. Unfortunately, insufficient research has been conducted so far on the differences between the norms that Italian native speakers learn in their school years and their actual linguistic behaviour. Which traits of the IUM (italiano dell’uso medio) pass unnoticed, which are detected but considered acceptable, and which are classified as mistakes are still up for debate. This study illustrates a survey involving native speakers of Italian coming from different geographical areas and social backgrounds who were invited to comment on the language used in newspaper articles containing IUM traits. Of course, this survey is part of a larger research project and is not considered to be exhaustive; however, it proves useful in testing the most effective procedures to administer the questionnaires and select the informants. In addition, preliminary results show a strong influence of the linguistic norm taught at school on the assessment not only of IUM traits but also of a range of other traits contributing to the linguistic reference model used by Italian native speakers.
Stefano, Ondelli; Romanini, Fabio
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2458674
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