Aim: To synthesize evidence about the effect of individual circadian preference (chronotype) and gender in the development of sleep and mood problems in nursing professionals. Background: Shift workers are more prone to having unhealthy habits and unfavourable clinical conditions than nonshift workers. These associations are mediated by chronotype and gender differences have also been detected. Design: A quantitative systematic review. Data sources: Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science from 1 July 2012 - 1 July 2017. Review methods: A systematic review was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines and two quality assessment tools: the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and GRADE. Inclusion criteria were quantitative studies where the sample consists entirely of nurses, analysing circadian rhythms or individual chronotype or gender and sleep/mood disturbances in nursing activity. The review was reported using the PRISMA statement. Results: A total of 23 studies were included in the review (five cohort studies and 18 cross-sectional studies). Data on gender-specific attention were scarce (two studies) and showed a higher incidence of sleep problems. Female nurses with eveningness-oriented personality seem to be more prone to having sleep disorders, insomnia, fatigue, and anxiety than male and morningness ones. Conclusions: Evidence seems to show that female nurses with an evening-oriented preference suffer more problems of insomnia, sleepiness, fatigue, and anxiety. The impact of our results may affect nurses, patient safety and the quality of clinical practice.

Chronotype, nursing activity, and gender: A systematic review

Fabbian F
Secondo
Conceptualization
;
Cappadona R
Methodology
;
Zucchi B
Methodology
;
Manfredini F
Investigation
;
Manfredini R
Penultimo
Supervision
;
2019

Abstract

Aim: To synthesize evidence about the effect of individual circadian preference (chronotype) and gender in the development of sleep and mood problems in nursing professionals. Background: Shift workers are more prone to having unhealthy habits and unfavourable clinical conditions than nonshift workers. These associations are mediated by chronotype and gender differences have also been detected. Design: A quantitative systematic review. Data sources: Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science from 1 July 2012 - 1 July 2017. Review methods: A systematic review was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines and two quality assessment tools: the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and GRADE. Inclusion criteria were quantitative studies where the sample consists entirely of nurses, analysing circadian rhythms or individual chronotype or gender and sleep/mood disturbances in nursing activity. The review was reported using the PRISMA statement. Results: A total of 23 studies were included in the review (five cohort studies and 18 cross-sectional studies). Data on gender-specific attention were scarce (two studies) and showed a higher incidence of sleep problems. Female nurses with eveningness-oriented personality seem to be more prone to having sleep disorders, insomnia, fatigue, and anxiety than male and morningness ones. Conclusions: Evidence seems to show that female nurses with an evening-oriented preference suffer more problems of insomnia, sleepiness, fatigue, and anxiety. The impact of our results may affect nurses, patient safety and the quality of clinical practice.
2019
López-Soto, Pj; Fabbian, F; Cappadona, R; Zucchi, B; Manfredini, F; García-Arcos, A; Carmona-Torres, Jm; Manfredini, R; Rodríguez-Borrego, Ma.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2403515
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