OBJECTIVES: This study describes a new method to detect autoantibodies against actin filaments (AAA) as a serological marker of intestinal villous atrophy (IVA) in celiac disease (CD), and reports the results of an Italian double-blind multicenter study. METHODS: IgA-AAA were analyzed by immunofluorescence using a newly developed method based on intestinal epithelial cells cultured in presence of colchicine. IgA-AAA were blindly evaluated prospectively in 223 antiendomysial antibody (AEA) and/or antitransglutaminase antibody (TGA) positive subjects and in 78 AEA and TGA negative subjects. IgA-AAA positive patients underwent an intestinal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, IgA-AAA were retrospectively investigated in 84 biopsy-proven CD patients and in 2,000 new consecutively collected serum samples from AEA and TGA negative nonbiopsied subjects. RESULTS: IgA-AAA were positive in 98.2% of the CD patients with flat mucosa, in 89% with subtotal villous atrophy, and in 30% with partial villous atrophy. IgA-AAA were present in none of the AEA and TGA negative nonbiopsied controls. In AEA and/or TGA positive CD patients IgA-AAA positivity significantly correlated with IVA (p < 0.000 in the prospective study, p = 0.005 in the retrospective study). In the prospective study, the values of sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value, the negative predictive value, and the efficiency of the IgA-AAA test to identify patients with IVA were, respectively, 83.9%, 95.1%, 97.8%, 69.2%, and 87.0%. Furthermore, a significant correlation (p < 0.0001) was found between the IgA-AAA serum titre and the degree of IVA (rs 0.56). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this multicenter study show that the new method for IgA-AAA detection could represent a practical diagnostic tool in AEA and/or TGA positive subjects, which would be especially useful when IVA shows a patchy distribution, when the histological picture is difficult to interpret, or when a biopsy could represent a life-threatening risk.

Enterocyte actin autoantibody detection: A new diagnostic tool in celiac disease diagnosis: Results of a multicenter study

Maggiore, G.;
2004

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study describes a new method to detect autoantibodies against actin filaments (AAA) as a serological marker of intestinal villous atrophy (IVA) in celiac disease (CD), and reports the results of an Italian double-blind multicenter study. METHODS: IgA-AAA were analyzed by immunofluorescence using a newly developed method based on intestinal epithelial cells cultured in presence of colchicine. IgA-AAA were blindly evaluated prospectively in 223 antiendomysial antibody (AEA) and/or antitransglutaminase antibody (TGA) positive subjects and in 78 AEA and TGA negative subjects. IgA-AAA positive patients underwent an intestinal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, IgA-AAA were retrospectively investigated in 84 biopsy-proven CD patients and in 2,000 new consecutively collected serum samples from AEA and TGA negative nonbiopsied subjects. RESULTS: IgA-AAA were positive in 98.2% of the CD patients with flat mucosa, in 89% with subtotal villous atrophy, and in 30% with partial villous atrophy. IgA-AAA were present in none of the AEA and TGA negative nonbiopsied controls. In AEA and/or TGA positive CD patients IgA-AAA positivity significantly correlated with IVA (p < 0.000 in the prospective study, p = 0.005 in the retrospective study). In the prospective study, the values of sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value, the negative predictive value, and the efficiency of the IgA-AAA test to identify patients with IVA were, respectively, 83.9%, 95.1%, 97.8%, 69.2%, and 87.0%. Furthermore, a significant correlation (p < 0.0001) was found between the IgA-AAA serum titre and the degree of IVA (rs 0.56). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this multicenter study show that the new method for IgA-AAA detection could represent a practical diagnostic tool in AEA and/or TGA positive subjects, which would be especially useful when IVA shows a patchy distribution, when the histological picture is difficult to interpret, or when a biopsy could represent a life-threatening risk.
Clemente, M. G.; Musu, M. P.; Troncone, R.; Volta, U.; Congia, M.; Ciacci, C.; Neri, E.; Not, T.; Maggiore, G.; Strisciuglio, P.; Corazza, G. R.; Gasbarrini, G.; Cicotto, L.; Sole, G.; Fasano, A.; De Virgiliis, Stefano
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/2387244
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 10
  • Scopus 61
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 45
social impact