The jugular venous pulse (JVP) is one of the main parameters of cardiac function and is used by cardiologists in diagnosing heart failure. Its waveform comprises three positive waves (a, c and v) and two negative waves (x and y). Recently, it was found that JVP can be extrapolated from an ultrasound (US) video recording of the internal jugular vein (IJV), suggesting its application in space missions, on which US scanners are already widely used. To date, the feasibility of assessing JVP in microgravity (microG) has not been investigated. To verify the feasibility of JVP assessment in microG, we tested a protocol of self-performed B-mode ultrasound on the International Space Station (ISS). The protocol consisted of a video recording of IJV synchronized with electrocardiogram that produces a cross-sectional area time trace (JVP trace) (in cm2). The scans were acquired in six experimental sessions; two pre-flight (BDC1 and -2), two in space (ISS1 and -2) and two post-flight (Houston PF1, Cologne PF2). We measured the mean and standard deviation of the JVP waves and the phase relationship between such waves and P and T waves on the electrocardiogram. We verified that such parameters had the same accuracy on Earth as they did under microG, and we compared their values. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of JVP trace in microgravity are higher than those on Earth. The sequence of (a, c, and v) ascents and (x and y) descents along the cardiac cycle in microG is the same as that on Earth. The cause-and-effect relationship between the P and T waves on the electrocardiogram and a and v waves, respectively, of JVP is also confirmed in microG. Our experiment indicated the feasibility of deriving a JVP trace from a B-mode US examination self-performed by an astronaut in microG.

Ultrasound Monitoring of Jugular Venous Pulse during Space Missions: Proof of Concept

Zamboni, Paolo
Primo
;
Sisini, Francesco
Secondo
;
Menegatti, Erica;Taibi, Angelo;Gadda, Giacomo;Tavoni, Valentina;Malagoni, Anna Maria;Tessari, Mirko;Gianesini, Sergio
Penultimo
;
Gambaccini, Mauro
Ultimo
2018

Abstract

The jugular venous pulse (JVP) is one of the main parameters of cardiac function and is used by cardiologists in diagnosing heart failure. Its waveform comprises three positive waves (a, c and v) and two negative waves (x and y). Recently, it was found that JVP can be extrapolated from an ultrasound (US) video recording of the internal jugular vein (IJV), suggesting its application in space missions, on which US scanners are already widely used. To date, the feasibility of assessing JVP in microgravity (microG) has not been investigated. To verify the feasibility of JVP assessment in microG, we tested a protocol of self-performed B-mode ultrasound on the International Space Station (ISS). The protocol consisted of a video recording of IJV synchronized with electrocardiogram that produces a cross-sectional area time trace (JVP trace) (in cm2). The scans were acquired in six experimental sessions; two pre-flight (BDC1 and -2), two in space (ISS1 and -2) and two post-flight (Houston PF1, Cologne PF2). We measured the mean and standard deviation of the JVP waves and the phase relationship between such waves and P and T waves on the electrocardiogram. We verified that such parameters had the same accuracy on Earth as they did under microG, and we compared their values. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of JVP trace in microgravity are higher than those on Earth. The sequence of (a, c, and v) ascents and (x and y) descents along the cardiac cycle in microG is the same as that on Earth. The cause-and-effect relationship between the P and T waves on the electrocardiogram and a and v waves, respectively, of JVP is also confirmed in microG. Our experiment indicated the feasibility of deriving a JVP trace from a B-mode US examination self-performed by an astronaut in microG.
Zamboni, Paolo; Sisini, Francesco; Menegatti, Erica; Taibi, Angelo; Gadda, Giacomo; Tavoni, Valentina; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Tessari, Mirko; Gianesini, Sergio; Gambaccini, Mauro
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
j.ultrasmedbio.2017.11.001.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: Article in press
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 426.08 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
426.08 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/2383043
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact