The congenital myopathies are a group of early-onset, non-dystrophic neuromuscular conditions with characteristic muscle biopsy findings, variable severity and a stable or slowly progressive course. Pronounced weakness in axial and proximal muscle groups is a common feature, and involvement of extraocular, cardiorespiratory and/or distal muscles can implicate specific genetic defects. Central core disease (CCD), multi-minicore disease (MmD), centronuclear myopathy (CNM) and nemaline myopathy were among the first congenital myopathies to be reported, and they still represent the main diagnostic categories. However, these entities seem to belong to a much wider phenotypic spectrum. To date, congenital myopathies have been attributed to mutations in over 20 genes, which encode proteins implicated in skeletal muscle Ca 2+ homeostasis, excitation-contraction coupling, thin-thick filament assembly and interactions, and other mechanisms. RYR1 mutations are the most frequent genetic cause, and CCD and MmD are the most common subgroups. Next-generation sequencing has vastly improved mutation detection and has enabled the identification of novel genetic backgrounds. At present, management of congenital myopathies is largely supportive, although new therapeutic approaches are reaching the clinical trial stage.

Congenital myopathies: disorders of excitation-contraction coupling and muscle contraction

Treves S
Secondo
;
Zorzato F;
2018

Abstract

The congenital myopathies are a group of early-onset, non-dystrophic neuromuscular conditions with characteristic muscle biopsy findings, variable severity and a stable or slowly progressive course. Pronounced weakness in axial and proximal muscle groups is a common feature, and involvement of extraocular, cardiorespiratory and/or distal muscles can implicate specific genetic defects. Central core disease (CCD), multi-minicore disease (MmD), centronuclear myopathy (CNM) and nemaline myopathy were among the first congenital myopathies to be reported, and they still represent the main diagnostic categories. However, these entities seem to belong to a much wider phenotypic spectrum. To date, congenital myopathies have been attributed to mutations in over 20 genes, which encode proteins implicated in skeletal muscle Ca 2+ homeostasis, excitation-contraction coupling, thin-thick filament assembly and interactions, and other mechanisms. RYR1 mutations are the most frequent genetic cause, and CCD and MmD are the most common subgroups. Next-generation sequencing has vastly improved mutation detection and has enabled the identification of novel genetic backgrounds. At present, management of congenital myopathies is largely supportive, although new therapeutic approaches are reaching the clinical trial stage.
Jungbluth, H; Treves, S; Zorzato, F; Sarkozy, A; Ochala, ; Sewry, C; Phadke, R; Gautel, M; Muntoni, F
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Congenital_myopathies_disorders_of_JUNGBLUTH_Publishedonline2February2018_GREEN_AAM.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: post print
Tipologia: Post-print
Licenza: PUBBLICO - Pubblico con Copyright
Dimensione 598.12 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
598.12 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Jungbluth-et-al.-2018.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: versione editoriale
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 2.22 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.22 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2382654
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 84
  • Scopus 132
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 124
social impact