Purpose: To test the hypothesis that a new microkeratome-assisted penetrating keratoplasty (PK) technique employing transplantation of a two-piece mushroom-shaped graft may result in better visual outcomes and graft survival rates than those of conventional PK. Methods: Retrospective chart review of 96 eyes at low risk and 76 eyes at high risk for immunologic rejection (all with full-thickness central corneal opacity and otherwise healthy endothelium) undergoing mushroom PK between 2004 and 2012 at our Institution. Outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), refraction, corneal topography, endothelial cell density, graft rejection, and survival probability. Results: Five years postoperatively, BCVA of 20/40 and 20/20 was recorded in 100% and over 50% of eyes, respectively. Mean spherical equivalent of refractive error did not vary significantly over a 5-year period; astigmatism averaged always below 4 diopters, with no statistically significant change over time, and was of the regular type in over 90% of eyes. Endothelial cell density decreased to about 40% of the eye bank count 2 years after mushroom PK and did not change significantly thereafter. Five years postoperatively, probabilities of graft immunologic rejection and graft survival were below 5% and above 95%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in endothelial cell loss, graft rejection, and survival probability between low-risk and high-risk subgroups. Conclusions: Refractive and visual outcomes of mushroom PK compare favorably with those of conventional full-thickness keratoplasty. In eyes at high risk for immunologic rejection, mushroom PK provides a considerably higher probability of graft survival than conventional PK.

A two-piece microkeratome-assisted mushroom keratoplasty improves the outcomes and survival of grafts performed in eyes with diseased stroma and healthy endothelium (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis)

Busin, Massimo
Primo
;
2015

Abstract

Purpose: To test the hypothesis that a new microkeratome-assisted penetrating keratoplasty (PK) technique employing transplantation of a two-piece mushroom-shaped graft may result in better visual outcomes and graft survival rates than those of conventional PK. Methods: Retrospective chart review of 96 eyes at low risk and 76 eyes at high risk for immunologic rejection (all with full-thickness central corneal opacity and otherwise healthy endothelium) undergoing mushroom PK between 2004 and 2012 at our Institution. Outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), refraction, corneal topography, endothelial cell density, graft rejection, and survival probability. Results: Five years postoperatively, BCVA of 20/40 and 20/20 was recorded in 100% and over 50% of eyes, respectively. Mean spherical equivalent of refractive error did not vary significantly over a 5-year period; astigmatism averaged always below 4 diopters, with no statistically significant change over time, and was of the regular type in over 90% of eyes. Endothelial cell density decreased to about 40% of the eye bank count 2 years after mushroom PK and did not change significantly thereafter. Five years postoperatively, probabilities of graft immunologic rejection and graft survival were below 5% and above 95%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in endothelial cell loss, graft rejection, and survival probability between low-risk and high-risk subgroups. Conclusions: Refractive and visual outcomes of mushroom PK compare favorably with those of conventional full-thickness keratoplasty. In eyes at high risk for immunologic rejection, mushroom PK provides a considerably higher probability of graft survival than conventional PK.
Busin, Massimo; Madi, Silvana; Scorcia, Vincenzo; Santorum, Paolo; Nahum, Yoav
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2380143
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