OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that genital prolapse may be related to peripheral nerve abnormalities, we examined the changes occurring to peptide-containing nerve processes supplying the periurethral muscles in women with stress urinary incontinence associated with prolapse. METHODS: Thirty patients with genital prolapse and 10 age-matched control subjects entered the study. All patients were evaluated by urodynamic investigations. Ten of 30 patients had pure stress urinary incontinence; none of the control subjects was incontinent. During surgery, four biopsy samples were obtained from each woman from the periurethral and perirectal muscles. The muscle sections were processed for immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies to glial (S-100 protein) and general neuronal markers (neuron-specific enolase) and neuropeptides, including neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and substance P. The evaluation of immunolabeled nerves was based on a semiquantitative analysis that allowed for a four-point ordinate scale score. RESULTS: S-100 and neuron-specific enolase immunoreactive nerve fibers, running either singly or in small bundles, along with a dense network of neural processes containing neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and substance P, were found throughout the connective tissue and striated muscle of the control specimens. In contrast, in the muscle specimens from those with genitourinary prolapse, both the density and the intensity of neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and substance P immunoreactive nerves were markedly reduced compared with the control specimens. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence of a reduced peptide-containing nerve supply to the perineal muscles provides a morphologic basis suggesting that neural abnormalities contribute to the pathogenesis of genital prolapse and urinary incontinence.

Abnormalities of somatic peptide-containing nerves supplying the pelvic floor of women with genitourinary prolapse and stress urinary incontinence

DE GIORGIO, Roberto
2004

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that genital prolapse may be related to peripheral nerve abnormalities, we examined the changes occurring to peptide-containing nerve processes supplying the periurethral muscles in women with stress urinary incontinence associated with prolapse. METHODS: Thirty patients with genital prolapse and 10 age-matched control subjects entered the study. All patients were evaluated by urodynamic investigations. Ten of 30 patients had pure stress urinary incontinence; none of the control subjects was incontinent. During surgery, four biopsy samples were obtained from each woman from the periurethral and perirectal muscles. The muscle sections were processed for immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies to glial (S-100 protein) and general neuronal markers (neuron-specific enolase) and neuropeptides, including neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and substance P. The evaluation of immunolabeled nerves was based on a semiquantitative analysis that allowed for a four-point ordinate scale score. RESULTS: S-100 and neuron-specific enolase immunoreactive nerve fibers, running either singly or in small bundles, along with a dense network of neural processes containing neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and substance P, were found throughout the connective tissue and striated muscle of the control specimens. In contrast, in the muscle specimens from those with genitourinary prolapse, both the density and the intensity of neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and substance P immunoreactive nerves were markedly reduced compared with the control specimens. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence of a reduced peptide-containing nerve supply to the perineal muscles provides a morphologic basis suggesting that neural abnormalities contribute to the pathogenesis of genital prolapse and urinary incontinence.
Busacchi, P; Perri, T; Paradisi, R; Oliverio, C; Santini, D; Guerrini, S; Barbara, G; Stanghellini, V; Corinaldesi, R; DE GIORGIO, Roberto
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/2374871
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