Background & Aims: Individuals with potential celiac disease have serologic and genetic markers of the disease with little or no damage to the small intestinal mucosa. We performed a prospective study to learn more about disease progression in these people. Methods: We collected data from 77 adults (59 female; median age, 33 years) diagnosed with potential celiac disease (on the basis of serology and HLA type) at Bologna University in Italy from 2004 through 2013. The subjects had normal or slight inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa. Clinical, laboratory, and histologic parameters were evaluated at diagnosis and during a 3-year follow-up period. Results: Sixty-one patients (46 female; median age, 36 years) showed intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, whereas the remaining 16 (13 female; median age, 21 years) were completely asymptomatic at diagnosis. All subjects tested positive for immunoglobulin A endomysial antibody and tissue transglutaminase antibody, except for 1 patient with immunoglobulin A deficiency; 95% of patients were carriers of HLA-DQ2. Duodenal biopsies from 26% patients had a Marsh score of 0, and 74% had a Marsh score of 1. A higher proportion of symptomatic patients had autoimmune disorders (36%) and antinuclear antibodies (41%) than asymptomatic patients (5% and 12.5%, respectively), and symptomatic patients were of older age at diagnosis (P <.05). Gluten withdrawal led to significant clinical improvement in all 61 symptomatic patients. The 16 asymptomatic patients continued on gluten-containing diets, and only 1 developed mucosal flattening; levels of anti-endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies fluctuated in 5 of these patients or became undetectable. Conclusions: In a 3-year study of adults with potential celiac disease, we found most to have symptoms, but these improved on gluten withdrawal. Conversely, we do not recommend a gluten-free diet for asymptomatic adults with potential celiac disease because they do not tend to develop villous atrophy.

Features and Progression of Potential Celiac Disease in Adults

Caio Giacomo;Giancola Fiorella;DE GIORGIO, Roberto
Ultimo
2016

Abstract

Background & Aims: Individuals with potential celiac disease have serologic and genetic markers of the disease with little or no damage to the small intestinal mucosa. We performed a prospective study to learn more about disease progression in these people. Methods: We collected data from 77 adults (59 female; median age, 33 years) diagnosed with potential celiac disease (on the basis of serology and HLA type) at Bologna University in Italy from 2004 through 2013. The subjects had normal or slight inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa. Clinical, laboratory, and histologic parameters were evaluated at diagnosis and during a 3-year follow-up period. Results: Sixty-one patients (46 female; median age, 36 years) showed intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, whereas the remaining 16 (13 female; median age, 21 years) were completely asymptomatic at diagnosis. All subjects tested positive for immunoglobulin A endomysial antibody and tissue transglutaminase antibody, except for 1 patient with immunoglobulin A deficiency; 95% of patients were carriers of HLA-DQ2. Duodenal biopsies from 26% patients had a Marsh score of 0, and 74% had a Marsh score of 1. A higher proportion of symptomatic patients had autoimmune disorders (36%) and antinuclear antibodies (41%) than asymptomatic patients (5% and 12.5%, respectively), and symptomatic patients were of older age at diagnosis (P <.05). Gluten withdrawal led to significant clinical improvement in all 61 symptomatic patients. The 16 asymptomatic patients continued on gluten-containing diets, and only 1 developed mucosal flattening; levels of anti-endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies fluctuated in 5 of these patients or became undetectable. Conclusions: In a 3-year study of adults with potential celiac disease, we found most to have symptoms, but these improved on gluten withdrawal. Conversely, we do not recommend a gluten-free diet for asymptomatic adults with potential celiac disease because they do not tend to develop villous atrophy.
Volta, Umberto; Caio, Giacomo; Giancola, Fiorella; Rhoden Kerry, J.; Ruggeri, Eugenio; Boschetti, Elisa; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; DE GIORGIO, Roberto
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/2374864
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