I n 1996, Lucio Gullo coined the term “benign pancreatic hyperenzymemia” (BPH) for a condition characterized by a chronic increase of serum amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase, and trypsin detectable in healthy people without any clinically or imaging-proven evidence of organic disease.1 Increased pancreatic enzymes levels are usually detected accidentally mainly as a result of screening tests in otherwise asymptomatic subjects. The exact incidence of the condition is unknown. The knowledge so far acquired on the BPH allowed for the identification of the following major laboratory and clinical features: (a) most often, the enzyme elevation is 2 to 4 times the normal range, but it can sometimes be much higher, increasing up to 15 times; (b) it occurs in adult and pediatric asymptomatic subjects, lacking any pancreatic or systemic diseases; (c) it persists over time with considerable fluctuations in serum enzyme concentration, including periods with normal values; (d) it can be either familial, when at least 1 family member shows the same abnormality, or sporadic; and (e) after the initial finding, the hyperenzymemia should be considered benign only after at least 2 years of follow-up, during which all imaging tests, that is, pancreatic computed tomography (CT) scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), must be negative. Despite this progress, the finding of increased pancreatic enzymes raises the suspicion of an underlying pancreatic disease in most physicians. As a result, asymptomatic subjects undergo numerous, expensive, and often useless investigations increasing health care costs and patients' concerns.2 Thus, the aim of this brief review is to provide the general practitioners and gastroenterologists with an update on the clinical and diagnostic features of BPH to guarantee a proper management of these otherwise healthy subject

Benign pancreatic hyperenzymemia: Lights on a clinical challenge

DE GIORGIO, Roberto
2017

Abstract

I n 1996, Lucio Gullo coined the term “benign pancreatic hyperenzymemia” (BPH) for a condition characterized by a chronic increase of serum amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase, and trypsin detectable in healthy people without any clinically or imaging-proven evidence of organic disease.1 Increased pancreatic enzymes levels are usually detected accidentally mainly as a result of screening tests in otherwise asymptomatic subjects. The exact incidence of the condition is unknown. The knowledge so far acquired on the BPH allowed for the identification of the following major laboratory and clinical features: (a) most often, the enzyme elevation is 2 to 4 times the normal range, but it can sometimes be much higher, increasing up to 15 times; (b) it occurs in adult and pediatric asymptomatic subjects, lacking any pancreatic or systemic diseases; (c) it persists over time with considerable fluctuations in serum enzyme concentration, including periods with normal values; (d) it can be either familial, when at least 1 family member shows the same abnormality, or sporadic; and (e) after the initial finding, the hyperenzymemia should be considered benign only after at least 2 years of follow-up, during which all imaging tests, that is, pancreatic computed tomography (CT) scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), must be negative. Despite this progress, the finding of increased pancreatic enzymes raises the suspicion of an underlying pancreatic disease in most physicians. As a result, asymptomatic subjects undergo numerous, expensive, and often useless investigations increasing health care costs and patients' concerns.2 Thus, the aim of this brief review is to provide the general practitioners and gastroenterologists with an update on the clinical and diagnostic features of BPH to guarantee a proper management of these otherwise healthy subject
Birtolo, Chiara; Migliori, Marina; Drewes Asbjørn, M.; Tomassetti, Paola; Imbrogno, Andrea; Fusaroli, Pietro; Casadei, Riccardo; Ricci, Claudio; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; DE GIORGIO, Roberto
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/2374833
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