The paper aims to shed some light on the impact of fuel prices and technological relatedness on green and non-green patenting dynamics and lock in to fossil fuel technologies. Specifically, we investigate whether green technology efforts come at the expense of other environmental or non-environmental invention activity. To do so, we employ Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) to detect the main technological domains exploited by the automotive industry during 1982–2008, using Triadic Patent Families (TPF) to proxy for the technological efforts in each technology field. The paper adds to the literature by examining explicitly whether fuel prices (used as a proxy for carbon tax) and technological proximity foster the substitution of non-green patents by green ones. In addition, we provide a novel contribution by testing whether these determinants impact on the competition among low-emitting vehicles. Our findings suggest that higher, tax-inclusive fuel prices are effective at redirecting patenting activity from non-green to green technology fields. Moreover, we observe that tax-inclusive fuel prices also induce a shift in patenting activity when we perform the analysis solely on green technology fields. Although this might result in potential lock-in to sub-optimal substituting technologies, our findings suggest that competition in the domain of environmental technology is focused mainly on ‘greening’ conventional cars and developing low-emission vehicles.

Fuel prices and the invention crowding out effect: Releasing the automotive industry from its dependence on fossil fuel

BARBIERI, Nicolo'
2016

Abstract

The paper aims to shed some light on the impact of fuel prices and technological relatedness on green and non-green patenting dynamics and lock in to fossil fuel technologies. Specifically, we investigate whether green technology efforts come at the expense of other environmental or non-environmental invention activity. To do so, we employ Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) to detect the main technological domains exploited by the automotive industry during 1982–2008, using Triadic Patent Families (TPF) to proxy for the technological efforts in each technology field. The paper adds to the literature by examining explicitly whether fuel prices (used as a proxy for carbon tax) and technological proximity foster the substitution of non-green patents by green ones. In addition, we provide a novel contribution by testing whether these determinants impact on the competition among low-emitting vehicles. Our findings suggest that higher, tax-inclusive fuel prices are effective at redirecting patenting activity from non-green to green technology fields. Moreover, we observe that tax-inclusive fuel prices also induce a shift in patenting activity when we perform the analysis solely on green technology fields. Although this might result in potential lock-in to sub-optimal substituting technologies, our findings suggest that competition in the domain of environmental technology is focused mainly on ‘greening’ conventional cars and developing low-emission vehicles.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
barbieri 2016 tfs.pdf

solo gestori archivio

Descrizione: Full text editoriale
Tipologia: Full text (versione editoriale)
Licenza: NON PUBBLICO - Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 1.23 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.23 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Barbieri-2369410 pre-print.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Pre print
Tipologia: Pre-print
Licenza: PUBBLICO - Pubblico con Copyright
Dimensione 1.22 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.22 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2369410
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 19
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 15
social impact