Objective: to continuously monitor oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter (SpO2) and assess the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Score (LLS) during ascent from 1154 m to 4559 m in 2 groups of subjects. Ten moderate altitude residents (≥1000-≤2500 m, MAR) and 34 low altitude residents (LAR). MAR are reported to have a lower incidence of AMS during ascent to higher altitudes compared with LAR. Whether this is related to higher SpO2 is still open to debate. Methods: Seventy subjects were recruited; 24-hour SpO2 monitoring with finger pulse oximetry was performed. All subjects rode a cable car from 1154 m to 3275 m and then climbed to 3647 m where 60 subjects (LAR) overnighted. The second day, 34/60 LAR reached the highest altitude. Ten subjects permanently living between 1100-1400 m (MAR) climbed directly to 4559 m without an overnight stop. Results: One LAR was excluded from the analysis as he performed a pre-acclimatization. We compared data of 10 MAR with data of 33 LAR who reached 4559 m. Two MAR had LLS =3 and 8 scored <3. Six LAR had an LLS of 3-4, 8 scored ≥5 and 19 scored <3. SpO2 monitoring showed higher mean SpO2 in MAR during ascent above 3600 m compared to LAR (MAR 79.1±4% vs LAR 75.5±5%; ANOVA, P=0.03). Conclusions: The results of this preliminary study suggest that residence at moderate altitude allows maintenance of higher SpO2 and reduced risk of developing AMS during rapid ascent to higher altitude.

Residence at moderate versus low altitude is effective at maintaining higher oxygen saturation during exercise and reducing acute mountain sickness following fast ascent to 4559 m

BERNARDI, Eva;POMIDORI, Luca;COGO, Annaluisa
2017

Abstract

Objective: to continuously monitor oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter (SpO2) and assess the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS) using the Lake Louise Score (LLS) during ascent from 1154 m to 4559 m in 2 groups of subjects. Ten moderate altitude residents (≥1000-≤2500 m, MAR) and 34 low altitude residents (LAR). MAR are reported to have a lower incidence of AMS during ascent to higher altitudes compared with LAR. Whether this is related to higher SpO2 is still open to debate. Methods: Seventy subjects were recruited; 24-hour SpO2 monitoring with finger pulse oximetry was performed. All subjects rode a cable car from 1154 m to 3275 m and then climbed to 3647 m where 60 subjects (LAR) overnighted. The second day, 34/60 LAR reached the highest altitude. Ten subjects permanently living between 1100-1400 m (MAR) climbed directly to 4559 m without an overnight stop. Results: One LAR was excluded from the analysis as he performed a pre-acclimatization. We compared data of 10 MAR with data of 33 LAR who reached 4559 m. Two MAR had LLS =3 and 8 scored <3. Six LAR had an LLS of 3-4, 8 scored ≥5 and 19 scored <3. SpO2 monitoring showed higher mean SpO2 in MAR during ascent above 3600 m compared to LAR (MAR 79.1±4% vs LAR 75.5±5%; ANOVA, P=0.03). Conclusions: The results of this preliminary study suggest that residence at moderate altitude allows maintenance of higher SpO2 and reduced risk of developing AMS during rapid ascent to higher altitude.
Bernardi, Eva; Pomidori, Luca; Davide, Cavallari; Gaia, Mandolesi; Cogo, Annaluisa
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2368616
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