OBJECTIVES: A purely hydraulic mechanism consisting in the pulsatile cuff-compression effect, by the cerebrospinal fluid displacement induced by the arterial pulsation, on the final portion of the bridging veins, has recently been hypothesized. This mechanism is able to maintain the constancy of cerebral blood flow (CBF) within the autoregulatory range, thus implying an exact balance between arterial inflow and venous outflow. In this study, we correlated arterial inflow and venous outflow during an experimentally induced condition of intracranial hypertension in pigs. METHODS: Mock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was progressively infused until a condition of brain tamponade was reached. Blood flow velocities at middle cerebral artery and sagittal sinus sites were evaluated simultaneously. RESULTS: Mean intracranial arterial blood flow velocity (IABFV), mean sagittal sinus blood flow velocity (SSBFV), and pulsatile-IABFV remained almost constant until cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) dropped below 60-70 mmHg; then, a progressive decrease in mean IABFV and SSBFV, together with an increase in pulsatile-IABFV, was evident. CONCLUSION: The strict similarity between mean IABFV and SSBFV patterns suggests that CBF decrement is mainly due to a decrease in the venous outflow, which, in turn, produces an obstacle to the arterial inflow. The correspondent increase in pulsatile-IABFV confirms the presence of a distal outflow obstruction. All these findings point towards a purely hydraulic mechanism underlying the cerebral autoregulation which acts at the level of the so-called Starling resistor

Blood flow velocities during experimental intracranial hypertension in pigs

DE BONIS, Pasquale;
2012

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: A purely hydraulic mechanism consisting in the pulsatile cuff-compression effect, by the cerebrospinal fluid displacement induced by the arterial pulsation, on the final portion of the bridging veins, has recently been hypothesized. This mechanism is able to maintain the constancy of cerebral blood flow (CBF) within the autoregulatory range, thus implying an exact balance between arterial inflow and venous outflow. In this study, we correlated arterial inflow and venous outflow during an experimentally induced condition of intracranial hypertension in pigs. METHODS: Mock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was progressively infused until a condition of brain tamponade was reached. Blood flow velocities at middle cerebral artery and sagittal sinus sites were evaluated simultaneously. RESULTS: Mean intracranial arterial blood flow velocity (IABFV), mean sagittal sinus blood flow velocity (SSBFV), and pulsatile-IABFV remained almost constant until cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) dropped below 60-70 mmHg; then, a progressive decrease in mean IABFV and SSBFV, together with an increase in pulsatile-IABFV, was evident. CONCLUSION: The strict similarity between mean IABFV and SSBFV patterns suggests that CBF decrement is mainly due to a decrease in the venous outflow, which, in turn, produces an obstacle to the arterial inflow. The correspondent increase in pulsatile-IABFV confirms the presence of a distal outflow obstruction. All these findings point towards a purely hydraulic mechanism underlying the cerebral autoregulation which acts at the level of the so-called Starling resistor
Anile, Carmelo; DE BONIS, Pasquale; Fernandez, Eduardo; Ficola, Antonio; Petrella, Gianpaolo; Santini, Pietro; Mangiola, Annunziato
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2368575
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact