Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the main cause of death worldwide, has a higher prevalence in women and recent evi- dence show that beside the traditional CVD risk factors (CVDRF) new potentially independent gender-specific CVDRF, such as obstetric, reproductive endocrine and rheumatic disorders, could accelerate the development of CVD. Since appropriate strategies for the improvement of high-risk women early identification must be created, we calculated the individual CVD risk scores (ICVDS) in a population of climacteric patients and we analysed them according to the pre-existing traditional and new CVDRF. Methods: We assessed the individual ICVDS of 390 women with- out previous pathologic cardiovascular events, aged 41–69 years, who referred to the Menopause and Osteoporosis Centre of the University of Ferrara. The ICVDS were estimated using National Institute of Health Cuore.exe software, on the base of patient’s age, latter blood cholesterol and blood pressure values, smoking habits and anti-hypertensive therapy usage. Results: Mean age of the sample was 54 years and mean ICVDS, 1.6%. Postmenopausal women had mean ICVDS of 1.8% while premenopausal subjects, of 1.1% (p < 0.0001). ICVDS were signifi- cantly related to Body Mass Index (r1⁄40.340, p1⁄40.001), abdom- inal circumference (r 1⁄4 0.331, p 1⁄4 0.001) and blood glucose (r 1⁄4 0.275, p 1⁄4 0.001) values. The average ICVDS of rheumatic patients was significantly higher than that of healthy women (2.5% vs 1.5%, p 1⁄4 0.004), while patients who suffered from gesta- tional diabetes mellitus or by pre-eclampsia had a mean ICVDS which was slightly, even if not significantly, higher than that of people without obstetric CVDRF (2.0% vs 1.6%, p 1⁄4 0.140). Conclusions: Climacteric patients affected by obstetric and rheum- atic CVDRF showed higher ICVDS than otherwise healthy patients, and values were statistically significant in the second subgroup.

Sex-related emerging cardiovascular risk factors and evaluation of the individual cardiovascular risk score

FILA, Enrica;ROMANI, Arianna;CASTALDINI, Maria Cristina;GRECO, Pantaleo;BONACCORSI, Gloria
2016

Abstract

Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD), the main cause of death worldwide, has a higher prevalence in women and recent evi- dence show that beside the traditional CVD risk factors (CVDRF) new potentially independent gender-specific CVDRF, such as obstetric, reproductive endocrine and rheumatic disorders, could accelerate the development of CVD. Since appropriate strategies for the improvement of high-risk women early identification must be created, we calculated the individual CVD risk scores (ICVDS) in a population of climacteric patients and we analysed them according to the pre-existing traditional and new CVDRF. Methods: We assessed the individual ICVDS of 390 women with- out previous pathologic cardiovascular events, aged 41–69 years, who referred to the Menopause and Osteoporosis Centre of the University of Ferrara. The ICVDS were estimated using National Institute of Health Cuore.exe software, on the base of patient’s age, latter blood cholesterol and blood pressure values, smoking habits and anti-hypertensive therapy usage. Results: Mean age of the sample was 54 years and mean ICVDS, 1.6%. Postmenopausal women had mean ICVDS of 1.8% while premenopausal subjects, of 1.1% (p < 0.0001). ICVDS were signifi- cantly related to Body Mass Index (r1⁄40.340, p1⁄40.001), abdom- inal circumference (r 1⁄4 0.331, p 1⁄4 0.001) and blood glucose (r 1⁄4 0.275, p 1⁄4 0.001) values. The average ICVDS of rheumatic patients was significantly higher than that of healthy women (2.5% vs 1.5%, p 1⁄4 0.004), while patients who suffered from gesta- tional diabetes mellitus or by pre-eclampsia had a mean ICVDS which was slightly, even if not significantly, higher than that of people without obstetric CVDRF (2.0% vs 1.6%, p 1⁄4 0.140). Conclusions: Climacteric patients affected by obstetric and rheum- atic CVDRF showed higher ICVDS than otherwise healthy patients, and values were statistically significant in the second subgroup.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2364424
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