MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are differentially expressed in the brain under pathologic conditions and may therefore represent both therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for neurologic diseases, including epilepsy. In fact, miRNA expression profiles have been investigated in the hippocampi of patients with epilepsy in comparison with control, nonepileptic cases. Unfortunately, the interpretation of these data is difficult because surgically resected epileptic tissue is generally compared with control tissue obtained from autopsies. To challenge the validity of this approach, we performed an miRNA microarray on the laser microdissected granule cell layer of the human hippocampus obtained from surgical samples of patients with epilepsy, autoptic nonepileptic controls, and patients with autoptic epilepsy, using the latter as internal control. Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to collect autopsy material from documented epilepsy individuals who died of non–epilepsy-related causes—we found only two such cases. However, hierarchical clustering of all samples showed that those obtained from autopsies of patients with epilepsy segregated with the other autoptic samples (controls) and not with the bioptic tissues from the surgery patients, suggesting that the origin of the tissue (surgery or autopsy) may be prevalent over the underlying pathology (epilepsy or not epilepsy). Even taking into account the limitations due to the small number of cases, this observation arises concerns on the use of autopsy tissue as control for this kind of studies.

Is autopsy tissue a valid control for epilepsy surgery tissue in microRNA studies?

RONCON, Paolo;ZUCCHINI, Silvia;SIMONATO, Michele
2017

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are differentially expressed in the brain under pathologic conditions and may therefore represent both therapeutic targets and diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers for neurologic diseases, including epilepsy. In fact, miRNA expression profiles have been investigated in the hippocampi of patients with epilepsy in comparison with control, nonepileptic cases. Unfortunately, the interpretation of these data is difficult because surgically resected epileptic tissue is generally compared with control tissue obtained from autopsies. To challenge the validity of this approach, we performed an miRNA microarray on the laser microdissected granule cell layer of the human hippocampus obtained from surgical samples of patients with epilepsy, autoptic nonepileptic controls, and patients with autoptic epilepsy, using the latter as internal control. Unfortunately, it is extremely difficult to collect autopsy material from documented epilepsy individuals who died of non–epilepsy-related causes—we found only two such cases. However, hierarchical clustering of all samples showed that those obtained from autopsies of patients with epilepsy segregated with the other autoptic samples (controls) and not with the bioptic tissues from the surgery patients, suggesting that the origin of the tissue (surgery or autopsy) may be prevalent over the underlying pathology (epilepsy or not epilepsy). Even taking into account the limitations due to the small number of cases, this observation arises concerns on the use of autopsy tissue as control for this kind of studies.
Roncon, Paolo; Zucchini, Silvia; Ferracin, Manuela; Marucci, Gianluca; Giulioni, Marco; Michelucci, Roberto; Rubboli, Guido; Simonato, Michele
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/2356516
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