Kinder- und Hausmarchen, published by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm between 1812 and 1815, were re-edited several times and came to include two hundred and ten folk narratives by 1857. Household Stories, from the Collection of the Bros. Grimm: Translated from the German by Lucy Crane; and Done into Pictures by Walter Crane, dates to 1882 and features fifty-two folk and fairy tales, an illustrated half-title and title-page, fifty-two head- and tailpieces, and eleven full-page designs. The English edition produced by the Crane siblings is the most remarkable outcome of an already established collaboration. While previous investigations have privileged the visual or the verbal components, the critical perspective adopted here addresses the illustrated translation as an interart work. There are correspondences in the aims pursued by the illustrator and the translator, because their theoretical framework is substantially similar, but there are also differences, because they chose distinct expressive forms. The purpose is not to assess whether Household Stories can be defined as a philologically rigorous English version of Kinder- und Hausmarchen enhanced by images, but to explain how Lucy and Walter Crane have created an illustrated translation that is both accurate and ingenious, exact and inventive.

Accurate reproduction, ingenious representation: Lucy and Walter Crane's Household Stories, from the Collection of the Bros. Grimm (1882)

SPINOZZI, Paola
2014

Abstract

Kinder- und Hausmarchen, published by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm between 1812 and 1815, were re-edited several times and came to include two hundred and ten folk narratives by 1857. Household Stories, from the Collection of the Bros. Grimm: Translated from the German by Lucy Crane; and Done into Pictures by Walter Crane, dates to 1882 and features fifty-two folk and fairy tales, an illustrated half-title and title-page, fifty-two head- and tailpieces, and eleven full-page designs. The English edition produced by the Crane siblings is the most remarkable outcome of an already established collaboration. While previous investigations have privileged the visual or the verbal components, the critical perspective adopted here addresses the illustrated translation as an interart work. There are correspondences in the aims pursued by the illustrator and the translator, because their theoretical framework is substantially similar, but there are also differences, because they chose distinct expressive forms. The purpose is not to assess whether Household Stories can be defined as a philologically rigorous English version of Kinder- und Hausmarchen enhanced by images, but to explain how Lucy and Walter Crane have created an illustrated translation that is both accurate and ingenious, exact and inventive.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/2326188
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