We have investigated the presence of non-classical soluble HLA-G molecules (sHLA-G) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and the possible relationships between CSF levels of sHLA-G, classical soluble HLA-I (sHLA-I) molecules, IL-10 amounts and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings were evaluated. We studied by ELISA technique the sHLA-I, sHLA-G and IL-10 levels in CSF of 50 relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients stratified according to clinical and MRI evidence of disease activity. Thirty-six patients with other inflammatory neurological disorders (OIND) and 41 with non-inflammatory neurological disorders (NIND) were used as controls. CSF mean levels were significantly higher in MS and OIND than in NIND for sHLA-I (p<0.001) and in MS than in controls for sHLA-G (p<0.001), with no differences among the various groups for IL-10 mean concentrations. An increase in CSF sHLA-I was found in MS patients with Gd-enhancing lesions (p<0.01), while sHLA-G and IL-10 were more represented in MS patients without lesional activity on MRI scans (p<0.02). In MRI-inactive MS, CSF IL-10 mean concentrations were significantly greater in patients with CSF-detectable levels of sHLA-G than in those without any evidence of CSF sHLA-G expression (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that CSF classical sHLA-I and non-classical sHLA-G levels may modulate MS activity as assessed by MRI acting in opposite directions. The association observed between sHLA-G and IL-10 when Gd-enhancing lesion resolved indicates a potential immunoregulatory role for IL-10 in the control of MS disease activity by shifting the sHLA-I/sHLA-G balance towards sHLA-G response.

Presence of detectable levels of soluble HLA-G molecules in CSF of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: relationship with CSF soluble HLA-I and IL-10 concentrations and MRI findings

Fainardi E
Primo
;
Rizzo R
Secondo
;
Vaghi L;Castellazzi M;Marzola A;Govoni V;Paolino E;Tola MR;Granieri E
Penultimo
;
Baricordi O
Ultimo
2003

Abstract

We have investigated the presence of non-classical soluble HLA-G molecules (sHLA-G) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and the possible relationships between CSF levels of sHLA-G, classical soluble HLA-I (sHLA-I) molecules, IL-10 amounts and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings were evaluated. We studied by ELISA technique the sHLA-I, sHLA-G and IL-10 levels in CSF of 50 relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients stratified according to clinical and MRI evidence of disease activity. Thirty-six patients with other inflammatory neurological disorders (OIND) and 41 with non-inflammatory neurological disorders (NIND) were used as controls. CSF mean levels were significantly higher in MS and OIND than in NIND for sHLA-I (p<0.001) and in MS than in controls for sHLA-G (p<0.001), with no differences among the various groups for IL-10 mean concentrations. An increase in CSF sHLA-I was found in MS patients with Gd-enhancing lesions (p<0.01), while sHLA-G and IL-10 were more represented in MS patients without lesional activity on MRI scans (p<0.02). In MRI-inactive MS, CSF IL-10 mean concentrations were significantly greater in patients with CSF-detectable levels of sHLA-G than in those without any evidence of CSF sHLA-G expression (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that CSF classical sHLA-I and non-classical sHLA-G levels may modulate MS activity as assessed by MRI acting in opposite directions. The association observed between sHLA-G and IL-10 when Gd-enhancing lesion resolved indicates a potential immunoregulatory role for IL-10 in the control of MS disease activity by shifting the sHLA-I/sHLA-G balance towards sHLA-G response.
2003
Fainardi, E; Rizzo, R; Melchiorri, L; Vaghi, L; Castellazzi, M; Marzola, A; Govoni, V; Paolino, E; Tola, Mr; Granieri, E; Baricordi, O
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/1683901
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