BACKGROUND: According to a number of reports, oxidative stress (OS) might be involved in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis (PO), one of the most critical disorders for elderly women1. In particular, evidences suggest that oxygen reactive species (ROS) are able to influence bone metabolism, inducing the imbalance between bone resorption and formation, responsible for PO onset2. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to investigate whether OS is involved in bone metabolism and PO development. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional population-based study on 103 climacteric women including 31 in peri- and 72 in post-menopause. Bone mineral density (BMD) of femur and spine was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The bone health status was also evaluated by assessing serum levels of bone alkaline phophatase (BAP) and collagen type 1 cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX-1), markers of bone formation and resorption, respectively. Serum levels of hydroperoxides (Hy), total antioxidants, uric acid (UA), thiols and bone markers were also determined. RESULTS: DXA analysis revealed 25 healthy, 47 osteopenic and 31 osteoporotic subjects. Total antioxidants mean values were significantly (p<0.05) lower in both osteopenic and osteoporotic with respect to healthy women. Thiols and UA also showed a similar trend, but the differences between groups were not significant. Antioxidants and UA were also significantly correlated with BMD of femur (r=0.373 and 0.390, respectively). Moreover, CTX-1 was associated with Hy (r=0.328, p<0.05), but only in postmenopausal group. CONCLUSION: OS could play an important role in PO development by increasing the rate of bone resorption. Our findings are also suggestive of a potential use of antioxidants supplementation in PO treatment.

Does oxidative stress play a role in bone metabolism and postmenopausal osteoporosis?

CERVELLATI, Carlo;CREMONINI, Eleonora;BONACCORSI, Gloria;PATELLA, Alfredo;PASCALE, Giuliana;CASTALDINI, Maria Cristina;FERRAZZINI, Stefania;CERVELLATI, Giulia;BERGAMINI, Carlo;
2011

Abstract

BACKGROUND: According to a number of reports, oxidative stress (OS) might be involved in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis (PO), one of the most critical disorders for elderly women1. In particular, evidences suggest that oxygen reactive species (ROS) are able to influence bone metabolism, inducing the imbalance between bone resorption and formation, responsible for PO onset2. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to investigate whether OS is involved in bone metabolism and PO development. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional population-based study on 103 climacteric women including 31 in peri- and 72 in post-menopause. Bone mineral density (BMD) of femur and spine was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The bone health status was also evaluated by assessing serum levels of bone alkaline phophatase (BAP) and collagen type 1 cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX-1), markers of bone formation and resorption, respectively. Serum levels of hydroperoxides (Hy), total antioxidants, uric acid (UA), thiols and bone markers were also determined. RESULTS: DXA analysis revealed 25 healthy, 47 osteopenic and 31 osteoporotic subjects. Total antioxidants mean values were significantly (p<0.05) lower in both osteopenic and osteoporotic with respect to healthy women. Thiols and UA also showed a similar trend, but the differences between groups were not significant. Antioxidants and UA were also significantly correlated with BMD of femur (r=0.373 and 0.390, respectively). Moreover, CTX-1 was associated with Hy (r=0.328, p<0.05), but only in postmenopausal group. CONCLUSION: OS could play an important role in PO development by increasing the rate of bone resorption. Our findings are also suggestive of a potential use of antioxidants supplementation in PO treatment.
oxidative stress
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/1459715
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