This article seeks to discuss the issue of what ‘English language’ should be taught in the classroom. English has now become an international or global language spoken all around the world and its spread is closely related to the phenomenon of the globalisation which has brought with it many significant changes in all aspects of society. The term ‘globalisation’ can have different definitions and can be perceived both as a threat and a challenge. As far as English is concerned, the globalisation has brought a number of changes in its current status and has led to the emergence of new forms of English or the so-called ‘(new) Englishes’. These varieties of English pose a problem in terms of intelligibility and a challenge to the traditional way of language teaching and learning. The English language is becoming the lingua franca of the world and it is more than just a simple means of communication. It is viewed as fundamental for the economic progress of a country and as a way of maintaining good international relationships with other countries all over the world. Speakers and learners of English are not just passively absorbing the language, but they are actively transforming it according to their own linguistic norms. This form of appropriation of the English language calls into question the concept of standardness and challenges tremendously the way it is taught. Although British and American English are the two best known varieties in the world, new varieties are taking shape around us, such as Globish or the Lingua Franca Core (LFC) for instance. Teachers need to reflect very carefully on what English language should be taught balancing both the students’ needs as well as the world’s real necessities. Thus, the aim of this paper is twofold: First, it is aimed at discussing problems facing English language teachers and learners as well as outlining aspects of attempted simplifications of core grammar and vocabulary. It will then attempt to present proposals for changes in practice in the classroom.

'Do you speak English' or ?Speak (you) English'? The impact of non-native varieties on English language teaching

LEONARDI, Vanessa
2010

Abstract

This article seeks to discuss the issue of what ‘English language’ should be taught in the classroom. English has now become an international or global language spoken all around the world and its spread is closely related to the phenomenon of the globalisation which has brought with it many significant changes in all aspects of society. The term ‘globalisation’ can have different definitions and can be perceived both as a threat and a challenge. As far as English is concerned, the globalisation has brought a number of changes in its current status and has led to the emergence of new forms of English or the so-called ‘(new) Englishes’. These varieties of English pose a problem in terms of intelligibility and a challenge to the traditional way of language teaching and learning. The English language is becoming the lingua franca of the world and it is more than just a simple means of communication. It is viewed as fundamental for the economic progress of a country and as a way of maintaining good international relationships with other countries all over the world. Speakers and learners of English are not just passively absorbing the language, but they are actively transforming it according to their own linguistic norms. This form of appropriation of the English language calls into question the concept of standardness and challenges tremendously the way it is taught. Although British and American English are the two best known varieties in the world, new varieties are taking shape around us, such as Globish or the Lingua Franca Core (LFC) for instance. Teachers need to reflect very carefully on what English language should be taught balancing both the students’ needs as well as the world’s real necessities. Thus, the aim of this paper is twofold: First, it is aimed at discussing problems facing English language teachers and learners as well as outlining aspects of attempted simplifications of core grammar and vocabulary. It will then attempt to present proposals for changes in practice in the classroom.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/1401965
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