The Triassic of the Dolomites offers a valuable opportunity to investigate the relationships between climate fluctuations and the changing depositional dynamics of carbonate platforms. The reconstruction of the large palaeoclimatic modification is based on the synthesis of multiple sedimentological, palaeobotanical, pedological, and geochemical proxies. The Triassic climate fluctuations were generally fast in nature and were probably associated with a latitudinal shift of the monsoon belts. During the Triassic, the Dolomites were placed at an intertropical northern latitude of about 16–18° and were generally dominated by dry climate and elevated temperature. At least five pulses toward moister climate are however documented, dated to Early Olenekian, Middle Anisian, Late Ladinian, “Middle” Carnian, and Late Norian times. Within this variable climatic scenario, the carbonate systems record a global evolutionary trend from Late Permian–Early Triassic regional shelves, rich in loose micrites and bio-calcarenites, to Anisian–Ladinian, synsedimentary cemented, steep sided (35–40°), high-relief platforms, and back to Carnian low angle ramps. Moist transgressive episodes were surprisingly prone to the spreading of corals and other colonial reef organisms, probably because of the reduced space competition by syndepositional cementation structures. The Permo- Triassic boundary extinction dramatically impacted on the calcified organism communities, but the carbonate depositional architecture nevertheless stayed almost unaffected through the boundary. The Early Triassic and earliest Anisian were commonly associated with hyperhaline, sometimes evaporitic conditions. Intervals of moister climate and efficient river discharge are however documented by earliest Induan and early Olenekian sediments. The latter terrigenous deposits matched a crisis in the carbonate production. After a return to arid conditions, during the Anisian, a fluctuation toward moister climate developed, associated to a massive continental vegetation cover. The Anisian tectonic activation of the region fragmented the previous carbonate shelf, triggering the development of three generations of fast prograding, but globally backstepping, isolated platforms, recording an increasing role of the synsedimentary cementation. A dry climate dominated the Late Anisian and Early Ladinian interval. At the time, a fast subsidence pulse was associated with platform drowning and basinal anoxia. Only a few aggrading pinnacles were able to survive, providing the nuclei for larger prograding platforms. During a dry climate interval, massive syndepositional cementation generated a major source of carbonate. Carbonate production stayed active through the Ladinian magmatic phase but the onset of volcanism was associated with a large modification in the platform carbonate facies, which became dominated by automicrites. Moist climate phases are well documented again during the Late Ladinian, followed by a return to dry conditions. The Late Ladinian–Early Carnian platforms prograded toward the eastern Dolomites depocentre, eventually infilling almost the whole of the accommodation space. The middle portion of the Carnian recorded renewed, sharply moist phases, associated with the demise of the rimmed platforms and with the return to loose sediment ramps. At least four separated humid fluctuations can be identified in this Carnian interval alone. Climate then returned to persistent aridity, until the Late Norian moist phase.

The Triassic of the Dolomites offers a valuable opportunity to investigate the relationships between climate fluctuations and the changing depositional dynamics of carbonate platforms. The reconstruction of the large palaeoclimatic modification is based on the synthesis of multiple sedimentological, palaeobotanical, pedological, and geochemical proxies. The Triassic climate fluctuations were generally fast in nature and were probably associated with a latitudinal shift of the monsoon belts. During the Triassic, the Dolomites were placed at an intertropical northern latitude of about 16-18 and were generally dominated by dry climate and elevated temperature. At least five pulses toward moister climate are however documented, dated to Early Olenekian, Middle Anisian, Late Ladinian, "Middle" Carnian, and Late Norian times. Within this variable climatic scenario, the carbonate systems record a global evolutionary trend from Late Permian-Early Triassic regional shelves, rich in loose micrites and bio-calcarenites, to Anisian-Ladinian, synsedimentary cemented, steep sided (35-40), high-relief platforms, and back to Carnian low angle ramps. Moist transgressive episodes were surprisingly prone to the spreading of corals and other colonial reef organisms, probably because of the reduced space competition by syndepositional cementation structures. The Permo-Triassic boundary extinction dramatically impacted on the calcified organism communities, but the carbonate depositional architecture nevertheless stayed almost unaffected through the boundary. The Early Triassic and earliest Anisian were commonly associated with hyperhaline, sometimes evaporitic conditions. Intervals of moister climate and efficient river discharge are however documented by earliest Induan and early Olenekian sediments. The latter terrigenous deposits matched a crisis in the carbonate production. After a return to arid conditions, during the Anisian, a fluctuation toward moister climate developed, associated to a massive continental vegetation cover. The Anisian tectonic activation of the region fragmented the previous carbonate shelf, triggering the development of three generations of fast prograding, but globally backstepping, isolated platforms, recording an increasing role of the synsedimentary cementation. A dry climate dominated the Late Anisian and Early Ladinian interval. At the time, a fast subsidence pulse was associated with platform drowning and basinal anoxia. Only a few aggrading pinnacles were able to survive, providing the nuclei for larger prograding platforms. During a dry climate interval, massive syndepositional cementation generated a major source of carbonate. Carbonate production stayed active through the Ladinian magmatic phase, but the onset of volcanism was associated with a large modification in the platform carbonate facies, which became dominated by automicrites. Moist climate phases are well documented again during the Late Ladinian, followed by a return to dry conditions. The late Ladinian-Early Carnian platforms prograded toward the eastern Dolomites depocentre, eventually infilling almost the whole of the accommodation space. The middle portion of the Carnian recorded renewed, sharply moist phases, associated with the demise of the rimmed platforms and with the return to loose sediment ramps. At least four separated humid fluctuations can be identified in this Carnian interval alone. Climate then returned to persistent aridity, until the Late Norian moist phase. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

The changing climate framework and depositional dynamics of Triassic carbonate platforms from the Dolomites

STEFANI, Marco;FURIN, Stefano;GIANOLLA, Piero
2010

Abstract

The Triassic of the Dolomites offers a valuable opportunity to investigate the relationships between climate fluctuations and the changing depositional dynamics of carbonate platforms. The reconstruction of the large palaeoclimatic modification is based on the synthesis of multiple sedimentological, palaeobotanical, pedological, and geochemical proxies. The Triassic climate fluctuations were generally fast in nature and were probably associated with a latitudinal shift of the monsoon belts. During the Triassic, the Dolomites were placed at an intertropical northern latitude of about 16–18° and were generally dominated by dry climate and elevated temperature. At least five pulses toward moister climate are however documented, dated to Early Olenekian, Middle Anisian, Late Ladinian, “Middle” Carnian, and Late Norian times. Within this variable climatic scenario, the carbonate systems record a global evolutionary trend from Late Permian–Early Triassic regional shelves, rich in loose micrites and bio-calcarenites, to Anisian–Ladinian, synsedimentary cemented, steep sided (35–40°), high-relief platforms, and back to Carnian low angle ramps. Moist transgressive episodes were surprisingly prone to the spreading of corals and other colonial reef organisms, probably because of the reduced space competition by syndepositional cementation structures. The Permo- Triassic boundary extinction dramatically impacted on the calcified organism communities, but the carbonate depositional architecture nevertheless stayed almost unaffected through the boundary. The Early Triassic and earliest Anisian were commonly associated with hyperhaline, sometimes evaporitic conditions. Intervals of moister climate and efficient river discharge are however documented by earliest Induan and early Olenekian sediments. The latter terrigenous deposits matched a crisis in the carbonate production. After a return to arid conditions, during the Anisian, a fluctuation toward moister climate developed, associated to a massive continental vegetation cover. The Anisian tectonic activation of the region fragmented the previous carbonate shelf, triggering the development of three generations of fast prograding, but globally backstepping, isolated platforms, recording an increasing role of the synsedimentary cementation. A dry climate dominated the Late Anisian and Early Ladinian interval. At the time, a fast subsidence pulse was associated with platform drowning and basinal anoxia. Only a few aggrading pinnacles were able to survive, providing the nuclei for larger prograding platforms. During a dry climate interval, massive syndepositional cementation generated a major source of carbonate. Carbonate production stayed active through the Ladinian magmatic phase but the onset of volcanism was associated with a large modification in the platform carbonate facies, which became dominated by automicrites. Moist climate phases are well documented again during the Late Ladinian, followed by a return to dry conditions. The Late Ladinian–Early Carnian platforms prograded toward the eastern Dolomites depocentre, eventually infilling almost the whole of the accommodation space. The middle portion of the Carnian recorded renewed, sharply moist phases, associated with the demise of the rimmed platforms and with the return to loose sediment ramps. At least four separated humid fluctuations can be identified in this Carnian interval alone. Climate then returned to persistent aridity, until the Late Norian moist phase.
Stefani, Marco; Furin, Stefano; Gianolla, Piero
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11392/1390245
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