Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disease triggered by volatile anesthetics and succinylcholine in genetically predisposed individuals. The underlying feature of MH is a hypersensitivity of the calcium release machinery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and in many cases this is a result of point mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium release channel (RYR1). RYR1 is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, but a recent report demonstrated the existence of this isoform in human B-lymphocytes. As B-cells can produce a number of cytokines, including endogenous pyrogens, we investigated whether some of the symptoms seen during MH could be related to the involvement of the immune system. Our results show that (i) Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-cells from MH-susceptible individuals carrying the V2168M RYR1 gene mutation were more sensitive to the RYR activator 4-chloro-m-cresol and (ii) their peripheral blood leukocytes produce more interleukin (IL)-1beta after treatment with the RYR activators caffeine and 4-chloro-m-cresol, compared with cells from healthy controls. Our result demonstrate that RYR1-mediated calcium signaling is involved in release of IL-1beta from B-lymphocytes and suggest that some of the symptoms seen during an MH episode may be due to IL-1beta production.

B-lymphocytes from Malignant Hyperthermia-susceptible Patients Have an Increased Sensitivity to Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor Activators

ZORZATO, Francesco;TREVES, Susan Nella
2001

Abstract

Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a pharmacogenetic disease triggered by volatile anesthetics and succinylcholine in genetically predisposed individuals. The underlying feature of MH is a hypersensitivity of the calcium release machinery of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and in many cases this is a result of point mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium release channel (RYR1). RYR1 is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, but a recent report demonstrated the existence of this isoform in human B-lymphocytes. As B-cells can produce a number of cytokines, including endogenous pyrogens, we investigated whether some of the symptoms seen during MH could be related to the involvement of the immune system. Our results show that (i) Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B-cells from MH-susceptible individuals carrying the V2168M RYR1 gene mutation were more sensitive to the RYR activator 4-chloro-m-cresol and (ii) their peripheral blood leukocytes produce more interleukin (IL)-1beta after treatment with the RYR activators caffeine and 4-chloro-m-cresol, compared with cells from healthy controls. Our result demonstrate that RYR1-mediated calcium signaling is involved in release of IL-1beta from B-lymphocytes and suggest that some of the symptoms seen during an MH episode may be due to IL-1beta production.
Girard, T; Cavagna, D; Padovan, E; Spagnoli, G; Urwyler, A; Zorzato, Francesco; Treves, Susan Nella
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/1211260
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