The wide use of ABPM has resulted in greater appreciation of the circadian time structure of BP variability and its clinical relevance. It is now recognized that the day-night change in BP results from an interplay of circadian rhythms in neurohumoral mechanisms coupled with temporal patterns in physical activity and mental load. The composite effect and balance of these endogenous and exogenous cyclic phenomena give rise to elevated BP during diurnal activity and reduced BP during nighttime repose in both normotension and uncomplicated essential hypertension. The balance is frequently disturbed in complicated and secondary forms of hypertension causing gross alteration of the 24-hour BP profile. ABPM also reveals the efficiency of antihypertensive treatment throughout the 24 hours and as a function of drug administration time. The pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of antihypertensive medications have been demonstrated to vary with ingestion time. Such time-dependencies arise from circadian rhythms in BP and underlying mechanisms. The effect of antihypertensive medications is not simply superimposed upon endogenous bioperiodicities. Rhythms in neurohumoral mechanisms of BP control may modulate treatment effect. Certain aspects of the shape of the 24-hour BP profile, such as the magnitude of the morning surge and nocturnal decrease, have been implicated as determinants of morbid and mortal cardiovascular events. One large clinical multicenter investigation, known as the CONVINCE (Controlled Onset Verapamil Investigation of Clinical Endpoints) trial, is aimed at assessing the impact (cardiovascular morbidity and mortality) of verapamil chronotherapy over standard diuretic or beta anatagonist treatment in hypertensive patients with at least one risk factor of coronary heart disease. ABPM will help ascertain to what extent depression of the morning surge in BP relates to reduction in cardiac morbidity and mortality in this as well as other such trials. In any event, the importance of ABPM and the indices derived from its application are just beginning to be appreciated and explored.

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: Application to clinical medicine and antihypertension medication trials

PORTALUPPI, Francesco
1996

Abstract

The wide use of ABPM has resulted in greater appreciation of the circadian time structure of BP variability and its clinical relevance. It is now recognized that the day-night change in BP results from an interplay of circadian rhythms in neurohumoral mechanisms coupled with temporal patterns in physical activity and mental load. The composite effect and balance of these endogenous and exogenous cyclic phenomena give rise to elevated BP during diurnal activity and reduced BP during nighttime repose in both normotension and uncomplicated essential hypertension. The balance is frequently disturbed in complicated and secondary forms of hypertension causing gross alteration of the 24-hour BP profile. ABPM also reveals the efficiency of antihypertensive treatment throughout the 24 hours and as a function of drug administration time. The pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of antihypertensive medications have been demonstrated to vary with ingestion time. Such time-dependencies arise from circadian rhythms in BP and underlying mechanisms. The effect of antihypertensive medications is not simply superimposed upon endogenous bioperiodicities. Rhythms in neurohumoral mechanisms of BP control may modulate treatment effect. Certain aspects of the shape of the 24-hour BP profile, such as the magnitude of the morning surge and nocturnal decrease, have been implicated as determinants of morbid and mortal cardiovascular events. One large clinical multicenter investigation, known as the CONVINCE (Controlled Onset Verapamil Investigation of Clinical Endpoints) trial, is aimed at assessing the impact (cardiovascular morbidity and mortality) of verapamil chronotherapy over standard diuretic or beta anatagonist treatment in hypertensive patients with at least one risk factor of coronary heart disease. ABPM will help ascertain to what extent depression of the morning surge in BP relates to reduction in cardiac morbidity and mortality in this as well as other such trials. In any event, the importance of ABPM and the indices derived from its application are just beginning to be appreciated and explored.
M. H., Smolensky; Portaluppi, Francesco
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11392/1207386
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